Lengthy and Detailed! Arizona Statewide Fishing Report A21

Rory’s Tips:

First order of fishing business, here’s a link to our brand new
2011 Summer Stocking Schedule:
http://www.azgfd.gov/pdfs/h_f/fishing/stocking/2011SumTroutStockSchedule.pdf.
Make your plans now, it’s shaping up to be a great year.

It’s got me smiling and dreaming about big trout dancing on the end
of the line (especially for my youngest boy and for the grand
kids).

It’s turning into a big fish year. First a 60-pound carp from
Apache Lake. Then a 31-inch largemouth bass from Lake Pleasant. Now
it’s a 34-pound striper from Lake Havasu (picture on the left). The
angler has submitted it for big fish of the year honors (see the
Havasu fishing report below).

Stay tuned, more to come. I’m sure. This might be the year when
fishing records topple.

As a matter of fact, a lot of big fish records tend to topple
the year after a major runoff year. If you think about it, we just
had two back-to-back years of great runoff (2009 and 2010) into our
interior lakes. Plus there is the cohort from another record runoff
year — 2005. The class of ought-five will likely be busting lines
and scales this year.

By the way, Lake Havasu is certainly a hot spot right now for
striped bass, largemouth bass and smallmouth bass. The Parker Strip
is probably worth a try as well for smallies.

It looks like the crappie spawn didn’t come off as expected (or
touted). The timing was right — mid April. There was a full moon
Sunday with the requisite high tide. We didn’t have any storms,
plus a high barometer. Looked pretty good for those breeding
perimeters. But it seems the water temperatures (especially the
nighttime ones) didn’t fall into the crappie biological criteria.
Then there was a strong, warm wind Sunday night pushing warn water
into the shallows, and at low tide, that warm water likely moved
out, taking lots of bedding fish with it (theory at least). All in
all, last week’s crystal ball needs to be returned to the gypsies
wandering in the constellation Pisces.

Since crappie only have a short spawning window, unlike bass with
their prolonged spawn, conditions have to be just right, it can’t
be a crappie crap shoot. So send me your crappie spawn predictions
and I’ll put the winner in the report (and on Facebook). Sound
good?

Let’s shift to the high country for lots of great news. All our
high country lakes are open and accessible, save one — Bear Canyon
Lake along the Mogollon Rim. It’s our one snow-drift hold out this
year. Last year it as Knoll Lake, it’s kissin’ cousin just down the
famous Rim Road (FR 300). Knoll Lake is accessible from the west —
the Coconino National Forest side. From the east (Apache-Sitgreaves
National Forest), there are snow drifts blocking the way past Woods
Canyon.

But if you are planning to fish Woods Canyon, keep in mind you’ll
have a quarter-mile walk right now, at least until they repair the
final stretch of road and the parking lot next to the store.

But both Willow Springs and Black Canyon lakes are both open, and
anglers are catching some larger hold-over trout, you know, those
pink-fleshed rainbows that have a salmon-like ambiance wafting up
from the dinner plate. Just a touch of lemon . . . I have to change
subject, my mouth is watering too much (missed lunch again).

(Picture on the right is from the Jr. Bassmasters Tournament at
Pleasant)

Way cool news, especially for you fly fishers — Carnero, Crescent
and Lee Valley did not fish kill this winter. Hold-over brookies at
Crescent will be a treat.

All roads to Big Lake are open (sounds like an old Bing Crosby and
Bob Hope movie on Netflix). The store is open, and there are boat
rentals available. This might be the only place in the high country
right now to rent boats, although it seems there are kayak and
canoe rentals at Luna Lake. Remember, the road from Sunrise to Big
Lake is now paved all the way. This can be the time to hook into
one of those huge cutthroat at Big Lake. Let us know if you catch
one.

Here’s what good folks at the Big Lake Store kindly sent me last
week to share with you:

Fishing has been real good. They are biting on salmon eggs,
Power Bait and worms. Also Z-Rays, Rooster Tails and Panther
Martins are doing real well from the boats. The average size has
been running approximately 12 inches. I have seen up to 3 pounds.
Also, it looks like Crescent Lake has come through the winter in
good shape. We are starting to see some nice looking fish from
Crescent. The Big Lake Store is open and renting boats. The store
number is (928) 521-1387. Thank you very much for your weekly
reports. You are doing a great job!

Sincerely, Rick Law

It sounds like the northern pike fishing is continuing to do well
at Upper Lake Mary near Flagstaff, and one angler even caught a
crappie recently (see the report below).

If you want a really good trout fishing tutorial, especially for
youngsters, check out the Urban Fishing Report below. My friend and
mentor Eric Swanson, who head the program, provided some quick and
easy tips. Follow them and you’ll stand a better chance of catching
trout — especially those larger hold-over ones in the mountain
lakes.

According to my friend Wayne Gustaveson at Lake Powell, not only is
it time to get there, the great striper bite is from the dam to
Navajo Canyon, just like days of old. Grab your anchovies and run
up there.

For fly anglers, Lees Ferry is also on fire. Just go.

Also, it’s time for the Lyrid meteor showers, so look skyward at
night, especially when you are on a lake. Seeing a streaking meteor
reflected on the water will make you go ahhhhhhh, or something
similar.

Please keep in mind that the weekly fishing report is not static —
was new information is received, the report is updated. In some
weeks, that doesn’t amount to much. This time of year, however,
there can be a lot of changes or new information.

It’s time to get out and catch some great memories. Maybe I’ll see
you out there.

 

 

The (April 19) tentative stocking schedule for the Page Springs
Hatchery:

Region 1: April Woods Canyon Lake (8,152), Nelson Reservoir
(8,000)

Region 2: White Horse Lake (5,148), Cataract Lake (4,752), Dogtown
Lake (7128), Oak Creek (1408), West Clear Creek (792), Huffer Pond
(264), Long Lake (1,584)

Region 3: Mingus Lake (880), Fain Lake (880 if it is ready)

Region 5: Rose Canyon Lake (1,980)

Canyon Creek Hatchery Report

April 10 – April 16, 2011

• Tunnel – 1,869 trout

• Rainbow Lake – 1,730 trout

• Fools Hollow Lake- 1,730 trout

• Long Tom Lake – 303 trout

• Black Canyon Lake – 1,751 trout

• Canyon Creek- 100 trout

Canyon Creek Hatchery

Stocking Information

April 18 – April 19, 2011

• Scotts Reservoir – 2,487 Rainbow Trout

• Willow Springs Lake – 3,500 Rainbow Trout

• Show Low Lake- 2,163 Rainbow Trout

• Canyon Creek- 100 Rainbow Trout

Hi Rory;

Here are some pictures and the results from our last Phoenix Jr.
Bassmaster’s Club Tournament at Lake Pleasant on Sunday, April
17.

We had 24 kids fish in three different age groups. Two kids caught
5-fish limits. There were a total of 57 fish brought to the scale
for weigh-in. All fish were released alive and well back into Lake
Pleasant. Big “Sack” of the day was just over 10 pounds. and Big
Fish of the day was 3.30 pounds. Fish were all caught on artificial
baits using a wide variety of techniques.

Our State Championship Tournament will be held at Lake Pleasant on
April 30. A special thank you to “The Hook Up” for all of their
support. Also thanks to Sportsman’s Warehouse, Fisherman’s Choice
and all of the parents and volunteers that support our club.

For more information on our club please visit
www.phoenixjuniorbassmasters.com

Tight Lines, Curtis Delagrange.

 

 

 

 

Crappie Report:

The spawn seems to be taking its sweet time this year. I have
caught male Crappie at Roosevelt and Bartlett recently that are not
in full color and still a ways off shore. I’ve heard the same thing
from Alamo and San Carlos which is really strange because the spawn
at these lakes is normally a month before the others. This just
goes to show you that the fish don’t all spawn at once. But with
water temps at nearly 70, all I can do is scratch my bald
head.

For most anglers this has been an off year to date. Even pre-spawn
hot spots like Alamo and San Carlos haven’t seemed to kick into
high gear. Let’s just hope that a spawn is/ will happen. Maybe the
fish are bedding in deeper water this year? Who knows, but its
almost time to get the night gear ready as day time temps are
getting very warm.

That being said, post-spawn Crappie fishing leading into the summer
can be every bit as good as pre-spawn. Parenting is hard work and
when the Crappie come off their beds they will be hungry. Going
into May it might be time to start looking deeper in open water and
off main lake points. But remember, find the shad and you’ll
probably find the Crappie.

Alamo- I heard reports a week or so ago about some pretty tough
conditions. However, a local bass angler and friend Athena Hammond
from Bass Pro Shops fished a tournament last weekend and said the
cleaning station was stuffed with folks cleaning tons of Crappie.
The next meeting of the Arizona Crappie Association will be at
Alamo on 5-14. I will be looking in deep water near the dam as I
have always done well there when the temps go way up.

Bartlett- Good old Bartlett has been a big surprise in the last 2
weeks. Many anglers are catching some pretty good numbers. There
are a lot of smaller fish caught but many jumbos as well. I fished
there last Friday with a friend from work and we caught 20 Crappie
along with many bluegills and a catfish all between 2 and 4:30 pm.
Try up by the no wake buoys, along the Yellow Cliffs and in Cat
Bay.

Pleasant- No recent reports

Roosevelt- Rosey is still a mystery to most anglers. You know the
Crappie are there, you can see them on your fish finder. But they
just won’t come to the party. On the 4-2 the AZCA held Spring
Crappie-Fest 2011 at Grapevine. Although it was a great event, we
only managed about 30 Crappie between 18 boats. Most of us believe
that there are 2 factors that are contributing to the tough
conditions. First, most of the active Crappie are deep in trees and
you just can’t get to them. Second, there are tons of baitfish
everywhere and the Crappie don’t have to hunt very hard for a meal.
But don’t give up on Rosey just yet. It may not be great this
spring but the future of the Crappie population looks good.

Congrats to this year winners of SCF Jack (Whaler) Sweeney and Ron
(Hairless) Martin of Scottsdale. Team Hairless Whaler brought in 5
Crappie for 6 lbs. 13 ozs. to take first place. Louis (Phishing
Phreek) Fleming, his girlfriend and sister brought in 5 fish for 6
lbs. 11 ozs. to take second and Kelley (Sandman) Brown and his wife
Patti had 5 fish for 6 lbs. 1 oz and took 3rd. The big fish of the
event was caught by Dave (Sparkchaser) Thompson’s son and weight in
at 2 lbs. even.

San Carlos- Even SC has been hit or miss lately. One day you’ll get
a limit and the next day 1 or 2. The lake has dropped about 10′
since the first of the year and many of us are worried about the
lake making it through the summer. Get out and fish SC now because
there may not be anything left to fish by monsoon.

You can find me at Bass Pro Shops in Mesa this week Wednesday and
Thursday from 1 pm to 9 pm and on Friday from 10 am to 7 pm. Stop
in if you want to share a report or get some gear.

To protect the future of our sport the Arizona Crappie Association
practices and promotes the immediate release of all Crappie under
10″ in length. For more information on the Arizona Crappie
Association including tips, reports, and membership, go to
www.azcrappie.com.

Bill (Piscolli) Eveland

AZCA/ BPS

 

CENTRAL WATERS

Note: If you have a fishing report, send it to “Been Fishing? at
bfishing@azgfd.gov

URBAN — An angler caught a 7½-inch bluegill at Red Mountain Park
using a hot dog.

The earthworm continues to be one of the best all-around fishing
baits. Trout love them fished near the bottom or suspended below a
bobber. If your favorite bait store offers dillys, buy them
instead. They are small worms and the perfect size for trout. Keep
them in a cooler and out of the sun and they will last up to a week
or longer. A size 8 baitholder hook is perfect for hooking the worm
though the “collar” and covering the shaft of the hook with the
barb end sticking out. Use minimal weight positioned 12-18 inches
above the hook. Either a size 4 or 7 split shot or a 1/8 – ¼ ounce
egg sinker above a swivel works best.

When bottom fishing it is important to let your bait settle to the
bottom, then slowly reel in the slack line. Try not to drag the
bait along the bottom or you are likely to get snagged. Keep the
rod very still and wait for a bite. If you don’t get a bite after
10-20 minutes, reel in quickly to keep your rig from snagging.
Replace your worm as needed. You can use a worm blower to inject
air into the tail half of the worm. It will make the worm float up
off the bottom, keeping your bait out of rocks and weeds and up in
the active feeding zone.

There are a couple different bobbers that work well for trout or
bluegill including ¾ – 1 ¼ inch round bobbers, small 4-5 inch
pencil bobbers, or slip bobbers. Round bobbers work best on windy
days, but it is hard to beat a pencil bobber. They are thin, stick
out of the water making them more visible, and offer less
resistance to biting fish. Bobbers allow you to fish your worm 2-5
feet deep. To fish deeper, learn how to rig and use a slip bobber
with a bobber stop. They take a bit of practice to set up right,
but they allow you to easily cast out while letting your bait slip
through the bobber to depths from 2-20 feet. Once rigged kids can
easily fish with them. Don’t forget bass and catfish love worms
too.

TEMPE TOWN LAKE — Recent surveys show lots of largemouth bass up
to four pounds, and yellow bass are also plentiful. For the
largemouth bass, recommend using artifcial worms or lizards worked
along the bottom. Try a No. 2 hook, and use a small split shot for
weight. Cast out, let it go to the bottom. Reel in line until you
can feel the lure. Stop. Let it rest. Simply raise up your rod tip
to move the bait. When you lower the rod tip, reel in the slack.
Repat the process with a slightly erractic cadence.

Town Lake is shallow, with a fairly flat bottom (except for the
reef balls we recently installed). It’s perfect for learning to
work lures across the bottom. This is a great place for practicing
techniques like drop shots and split shots.

For the yellow bass, try gold KastMasters (small) slowly reeled in
just off the bottom. An erratic retrieve can work well to make them
kind of dance through the water. Also try yellow and black inline
spinners, such as Rooster Tails.

LAKE PLEASANT – Lake elevation 1,697 feet (94 percent full).
Striper fishing is very good during the day, but a little tougher
at night during the full moon. However, you can still catch
stripers at night by finding schools of them and chumming to hold
them. Submersible lights just won’t out compete the big glorious
moon right now, but there is a Lyrids meteor shower to add extra
entertainment.

From all reports so far, the best striper fishing is best using
frozen anchovies. But we are also hearing about some stripers
hitting shad at the surface — not a lot, just sometimes. Not a bad
strategy to be armed with a topwater lure.

Seeing lots of bass fry in the northern coves, which also means
you’ll be able to find post-spawn bass, spawning bass and even bass
staging for the spawn right now. If you can’t zone in on one group,
try the others. Post spawn bass will likely be found around points,
islands and reefs, but not exclusively so — they will follow the
shad. Or the males will be hanging out with the fry in the coves.
Staging bass might also be found off the points — points can be a
really good bet right now. Don’t ignore them.

Fishermen are catching a few smallmouth bass tending to their beds.
Clear water is exactly what the smallmouth like. There’s not a lot
of smallies, but enough to add a little spice to the fishing
equation here.

One father son duo fought the wind during their fishing
excursion. Stripers and whites were not interested in their
presentation but the largemouth sure liked it. They caught about 12
and another 8 got away. When the wind died so did the bite. No info
on what they used.

A solo angler hit the water at first light but the fish weren’t
interested in his presentations for the first 4 hours. Finally a
t-rigged dark senko tossed in the brush produced 5 largemouth but
only 3 made it into the boat. The other two got cold feet and spit
the lure out at the last second. The largest fish was about 1.5
pounds.

Another fisherman started in the Aqua Fria at 7am but the fish
weren’t interested until about 10 a.m. He caught 4 largemouth bass
with an oxblood Roboworm and a small striper fell for a spoon.
There were lots of fish in the 40 to 60 foot range. Water temp was
64.5 degrees.

ROOSEVELT LAKE — Lake Elevation is 2,146 ft (94 percent full).
Tonto Creek runoff is 39 cfs while inflow from the Salt River is at
288 cfs. For all intense purposes, the runoff season has past
unless an unusual storm drops lots of moisture in the watershed.
But at 94 percent, Rosy is looking really good. Having a stable
lake level may result in sport-fish entering patterns anglers can
more easily figure out. Lots of clear water this year — it’s not
soupy brown gravy like last year at this time. The spat of cold
weather more than a week ago might have also played a role in
disrupting biological patterns.

By all accounts so far, the crappie have not begun to spawn. A
biologist doing a linear sampling said the crappies he caught were
possibly a week to two weeks away from full egg development.

Two anglers fished from safe light to 1 p.m. on the Salt end among
the trees. Water temp was about 64 degrees. The best lures were
Yamomoto Kut tails and Yum Dingers in the middle of the trees in
the northern coves. The bite died about 10 a.m., but was
resurrected again after 11. In all they caught over 20 fish by
pitching plastic worms and Hula grubs next to and among trees in
about 10 feet of water close to drop-offs.

One angler found some bass chasing shad in a cove and landed 7
using topwater. All were two pounds or less. The sun came up and
the bite died. The rest of the afternoon he used spinnerbaits,
Senkos and drop-shots to land10 more.

Angler report:

Rory,

Three of my friends and I went fishing at Roosevelt Lake March
16th. We started fishing at 7:15 around Windy Hill. After about an
hour with no bites we moved to Salome Cove. There were several
boats in there fishing but we saw no one catching fish. We used
minnows at different depths and crank baits. We caught one bass on
a white jig. At about 12:30 we moved up toward the river and fished
till 3 p.m. The water temperature was 62 and the water was very
clear, you could see 12 foot deep. I stopped at the cleaning
station and ask the angler that was there how he did. He was
fishing for bass and had four. There was one other angler that
showed up he had about the same. They said it was real slow today.
We are going to San Carlos next week for crappie; I will give you
an update when I get back.

Thanks Tim

Good Afternoon,

We took the kids to Roosevelt for the first weekend of their spring
break. My mom and dad, sisters, and a couple of nieces/nephews
joined us making a mini family reunion out of the trip. The weather
was beautiful but the fish not so accommodating. We hit the water
at daylight on Saturday and after a quick run from the Bobcat Boat
Ramp started working secondary points around Windy Hill. I had high
hopes after catching three nice bass in the first hour.
Unfortunately things went dead after that. Only three more bites,
two thrown hooks and one bass to show for another couple days of
fishing. I am sure that we could have managed a couple more with
hard work but we were there for some relaxing family time. Can’t
wait to go back, hopefully for a little more catching next time but
the fishing’s always good this time of year.

Eric Savage

APACHE – Lake elevation is 1,909 feet (95 percent full).

Fishing is fantastic at Apache. Anglers are mostly catching bass
hanging out on beds.

Crappie are susceptible to trolling jigs and minnows along the
shorelines over the shelves.

Bluegill are hanging near emergent vegetation.

Carp and or buffalo fish are going nuts mingling in the coves
and believe it or not bumping into the parked pontoon boats at the
marina keeping some campers up at night. The carp on the left
tipped the scales at around 60 pounds recently.

This is also a good time to target yellow bass using gold
KastMasters.

Look for walleye in the shallows at first and last light, or in
deep shady areas during the day. Walleye fishing at night could be
viable using night crawler rigs, or drop-shot rigs with two hooks,
one with a night crawler and one with a live minnow.

CANYON — Lake elevation is 1,657 feet, which is 95 percent
full.

Canyon is producing some nice bass. An angler fished somewhat
deep over spawning beds with T-rigged worms and drop-shot. He
caught 8 bass most were loaded with eggs. One bass was over 9
pounds. Another angler caught 10 bass using jigs.

Even though Canyon is lunker city, it can be tough to fish most of
the year. Right now is a good time to get to know this lake and
have a better chance of catching fish thanks to the spawn. Please
practice catch-and-release on these spawning fish to help the
fishery.

Angler report:

Went kayak fishing on 3-19-2011, the wife and i have only been here
two times, fishing was slow, no bites for first 3 hours, then we
paddled to the back of the canyon were no boats are allowed and i
caught a real nice 2 pound bass, it was really fat. saw two guys on
the main lake pitching jigs in to cat tails and they caught a real
nice bass. they sure made pitching jigs into cover look easy,
that’s a skill i would like to have. note i was using a drop shot
robo worn, just a torn off peace of a whole worm, about 2 inches.
its was blue gill color. i will post pic. a soon as i can figure it
out. thanks for having this feature of adding pictures.

Kevin Wilson

SAGUARO — Lake elevation 1,524 feet at 91 percent full. No recent
reports, but Saguaro can be tremendous for spawning largemouth
bass. Don’t ignore the plentiful yellow bass — use gold
KastMasters or yellow and black inline spinners, such as Rooster
Tails. Meal worms or night crawlers under bobbers in the coves can
also work, especially for youngsters. Saguaro is also an early
catfish lake — go after the plentiful channel cats using any stink
bait, hot dogs, or what have you. Also take a can of corn and chum
to attract, well, everything.

BARTLETT — Lake elevation is 1,763 ft, which is 56 percent
full. Reservoir release is 1,300 cfs, which means the lake level is
consistently dropping, which can disrupt the bass spawn. Some nice
crappies are being caught, but it doesn’t appear they are spanwing
net.

Largemouth bass fishing can be exceptional right now, this is prime
largemouth bass spawning time. Look for bass in the coves. But
don’t ignore the points, islands and reefs for post-spawn bass, or
even those bass just now staging for the spawn.

This is the leading edge of the great flathead catfish season.
Small carp or bluegill can be the ticket to catching these huge
voracious fish. This is also a good time to target channel
catfish.

Angler report:

(April 20) Yesterday at Bartlett was slow for me. The lake dropped
about 4 feet since I was there last Friday and my little honey hole
only gave us 4 Crappies and a 3 to 4 lbs channel cats. The
afternoon wind didn’t help either. A good friend of mine reported
catching smaller Crappies all day in several different spots.

Bill Eveland

To Bill Eveland, Bass Pro:

Thanks for all your help! We a good day at Bartlett. Other than
not knowing we needed to buy a park pass (we just assumed there
were drop boxes like Pleasant) and some sunburn. We didn’t get on
the water til almost 8 a.m. due to our pass problem. However, we
caught 3 crappies..2 good ones over 1lb and 1 small one, 1 bass and
4 fat sunfish. Wind started around 10 a.m. so after that it was
tough trolling. All fish went back to be caught again! I have
included a picture of one of the good ones I hooked! Thanks for
taking the time to share your knowledge, I believe it made all the
difference!

Brett Spencer

Surprise AZ

Editor’s Note: The Spencer family was looking for crappie
fishing information, so we directed them to Bill Eveland for
specific tips. Thanks for helping out Bill!

HORSESHOE – Lake elevation is at 1,985 feet 24 percent full.
They are releasing water at 400 cfs.

VERDE RIVER – Verde River flow at Tangle is 241 cubic feet per
second. Release from Bartlett Lake is 1,300 cfs.

SALT RIVER – Salt River into Roosevelt is 288 cfs, and Salt River
Canyon is 221 cfs. They are releasing 8 cfs out of Stewart Mountain
dam from Saguaro.

LOWER SALT RIVER – Anglers are catching bass along the shoreline
near emergent and overhanging vegetation. White spinners will get
their attention.

CREEKS (Haigler, Canyon, Tonto, Christopher, East Verde, Workman) –
The runoff season is over, so all streams are now imminently
fishable. Rember, we renovated Tonto Creek this winter, so it is a
much improved fishery.

We have plans to renovate many of the other creeks over the next
months and years. We’ll keep you updated.

Canyon Creek was stocked with rainbow trout last week. It also
holds resident browns. Be sure to check the regulations — there is
a an area of limited take of trout, and also a stretch below th OW
Bridge that is catch-and-release only with artificial fly and lure
only.

 

 

 

 

COLORADO RIVER NORTHWEST

Note: If you have a fishing report, send it to “Been Fishing? at
bfishing@azgfd.gov

LAKE POWELL – Lake Powell Fish Report – April 20, 2011

Lake Elevation: 3,610

Water Temperature 53 – 58 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson

Spawning tension continues as bass and crappie are ready to spawn
but temperature is just not warm enough. Days are warm but a
persistent afternoon breeze mixes the warm surface layers which
delays spawning. Water temperature this morning was 53.7 at
Wahweap. In years when warming is late, spawning occurs in isolated
locations in each cove as temperature exceeds 60 F in the
afternoon. There are places on Lake Powell where bass spawning has
begun but over the majority of the lake it is still a waiting
game.

Remember that bass spawn more than once with each male protecting
as many as 4 different nests of fry each spring. The first spawn is
overdue because of weather which will reduce spawning potential to
only 3 nests this year. Expect bass spawning to extend well into
mid May. The first spawn is the most exciting because low lake
levels allow shallow nests and guarding bass to be seen with the
naked eye. After water rises rapidly, nests are deeper, banks
slough in the water, clarity is reduced and sight fishing is over
for the year. Bass and crappie are still caught but the visual
portion of the equation is greatly reduced. Nevertheless spawning
is imminent and good fishing continues for bass. It will be better
as spawning begins over the length of the lake.

Striper fishing in the southern portion of the lake is still HOT as
striper schools roam along cliff walls. Large numbers of stripers
have been caught by bait fishermen from the dam to Navajo Canyon.
The key feature to find is a 25-40 foot deep ledge or shelf that
extends into the main channel. Stripers swim over shallow ledges
looking for crayfish and will respond to chum lying on the bottom.
Pre chum likely spots and return to them sometime later to catch
fish as they return to look for more food. Perhaps the best spot
this week has been Buoy 3 near the mouth of Antelope Canyon.

Water temperature is essentially the same as it was in March. That
means most fish are still behaving exactly as they did last month.
Patterns that worked in March are still working this week.
Largemouth bass are in shallow muddy water in the backs of canyons.
They are vulnerable to a slow methodical retrieve as lures are
worked through tree limbs and allowed to rest on bottom for
extended periods. Crappie are near brush but can also be found
suspended in open water. Try trolling a small jig very slowly using
the trolling motor to control speed.

dalejones2A good portion of the striper population, particularly
juvenile fish and trophy size individuals, still reside in the back
of the canyons. Juveniles are vulnerable to fast trolling (4.5 mph
or faster). My most effective technique now is to troll fast and
hook a juvenile fish. As that fish is being retrieved spoons are
deployed by other anglers in the boat. School fish trailing the
hooked fish dive as they see the boat and discover the spoons at
depth. Spoons are readily taken by trailing fish. More stripers are
caught on spoons than by trolling at the end of the day.

There are many ways and many places where fish are being caught on
Lake Powell. The next 2-3 weeks will provide the best of the spring
fishing. Use your favorite technique to catch fish. It’s just a
matter of being here on a day when the weather cooperates.

LEES FERRY — April 19, 2011 by Lees Ferry Anglers
(www.leesferry.com)

Today’s Weather: Partly cloudy, high of 78 degrees. It looks
like the temperature should be in the high 70s for the remainder of
the week. If you have time get out of the house and come
fish.

Fly Fishing: The fishing has been astounding. And these trout are
fat and sassy and healthy as can be.

The river is in great shape with many abundant wading locations.
Concentrating on the softer inside seams and the drop offs.
Nymphing has been highly productive. Varying the length of the
leader and split shot amount depending on the water you are
fishing.

Using a double zebra midge rig has worked great. Keep in mind to
use different colors and sizes. Another option to try is a zebra
midge with a glow bug dropper. San Juan worm with a zebra midge
dropper has also produced successful results.

There are a few fish still on the spawning beds and the spawn has
slowed down some.

Using a dry fly dropping a zebra midge has been effective in
certain areas with a few fish taking the dry.

Expect to have a blast if you come this week.

Walk in:

The flows are currently at a constant 16,000cfs, as of the fourth,
which are remarkably ideal conditions for the walk-in area.

Fishing has been excellent, focusing a lot of attention in the
Upper and Lower Boulder fields. Concentrating much of the time on
the softer seams especially near and around boulders. The fish tend
to hang around the drop offs throughout this section of water. The
Paria riffle has also been fishing very well.

Fishing two zebra midges of various sizes and colors has been
productive. Another good option is to fish a zebra midge above a
smaller glow bug. San Juan Worms have also been effective as a lead
fly dropping either a zebra midge or glow bug below.

A good tip is to vary your length between the indicator and lead
fly as well as to adjust the amount of split shot depending on the
water depth and the area you are fishing in order to produce more
results. Start fishing in close gradually working your way out to
deeper water.

There are lots of fish to be caught, all very healthy. Fishing is
great at the walk-in and the weather is spectacular.

Spin Fishing:

Spin fishing is off the charts! We’ve been hammering fish the last
few days. Bouncing glow bugs off the bottom has been working
remarkably well and produced many strikes. You can also try fishing
gold Castmasters or black and gold Panther Martin.

If you have some news you would like to report about fishing lees
ferry, the walk-in section or up river please e-mail your report
to: anglers@leesferry.com Attn. Lees Ferry Fishing Report We would
be happy to have your input, and pass it along.

Terry Gunn 4/4/11:

Good News!! As of today, the water flows have dropped back to
16,000-cfs constant for the near future (most likely until May 1).
This is very good news for the fishing during this time of year.
Early April is historically the beginning of epic midge hatches,
and also the lower flows should allow access to several wading
spots to take advantage of the prolific midge hatches and increased
trout feeding activity. In addition to the feeding fish, there are
spawning fish throughout the river and many fish are spawning in
shallow water areas that has seen no spawning activity since the
90’s due to the lower water flows that have resulted from the
drought. We have been using dry dropper rigs, heavy nymph rigs, and
double tiny rigs depending on the spots that we are fishing. The
fishing this spring both upriver and the walk-in should be great
despite the higher water. The fish are happy and crowds are
non-existent so now is a great time to visit the Ferry!

A reminder that we will be seeing high water flows until September,
2011. The reason for these high flows is an attempt to increase the
water volume in Lake Meade and this is the largest snow pack that
the Rockies has seen since 1997 which provides enough water to
allow the

high releases. It is important to remember that the higher releases
are really good for the heath of the river and fish…every
“fishing boom period” at Lees Ferry has been preceded by extended
high water flows just like the flows that we are currently
getting.

We currently had a group that fishes with us every year for the
past 25 years and they say that this trip was the BEST trip that
they have ever experienced here at the Ferry.

LAKE MEAD – The current water level is around 1,096 feet above
msl. Lake levels have been farily steady the last month. The
Largemouth are biting. Try plastics in 5-8 feet. Striper fishing
has been slow, even at night under lights. Cut anchovies are still
the bait of choice. Full moon was April 17, so fishing under lights
at night might not be as good right now unless you chum when
spotting schools of stripers on your fish finder. Lyrid meteor
showers this week may make night fishing more interesting
though.

Fish for stripers in 50 plus feet of water to find the larger
fish. If you can locate the shad, the stripers are not far behind.
Trolling usually works best in areas were shad are found and best
done in the early mornings and evenings.

Launching conditions at South Cove have improved as the water
level has gone up. There are currently four lanes. Launching
conditions in general are better at Temple Bar than South Cove.

Important notice: With the discovery of invasive quagga mussels
in Mead, Mohave and Havasu, proper cleaning of all watercraft is
critical to help prevent the spread of these invaders. Please drain
and dry your livewell and bilge on land. Drain all the water you
can from your engine. Also, inspect your vessel and trailer,
removing any visible mussels, but also feel for any rough or gritty
spots on the hull. These may be young mussels that can be hard to
see.

For more information, go to the Arizona Game and Fish
Department’s web pages at azgfd.gov or visit
http://100thmeridian.org/.

LAKE MOHAVE – The lake level is around 642 feet above msl. The
smallmouth are are hitting soft baits when worked slowly. Trolling
with anchovies in 30-50 feet has been producing some stripers,
while catfish are on the bottom. While the number of stripers in
Mohave has been decreasing, the quality of the fish caught has
increased.

Submersible lights fished during the new moon are an effective way
to catch stripers. Cut anchovies usually work the best.

Biologists from both Arizona Game and Fish Department and Nevada
Division of Wildlife with the help of volunteers, National Park
Service and Bureau of Reclamation personnel have continued to
install fish habitat in Carp Cove, Box Cove, Shoshone, and
Arrowhead. Fish habitat consists of PVC structures, wood pallet
structures, tamarisk bundles, and some Christmas trees. The
largemouth, smallmouth, bluegill and catfish are really utilizing
the new structures. Additional habitat will be added at several
locations over the next two years. These structures are fish
magnets.

There is a wheelchair accessible fishing pier just south of the
main launch ramp at Katherine’s Landing. If you fish Mohave and are
having luck, please e-mail me at mchmiel@azgfd.gov so I can share
your successes with others.

Important notice: With the discovery of invasive quagga mussels
in Mead, Mohave and Havasu, proper cleaning of all watercraft is
critical to help prevent the spread of these invaders. Please drain
and dry your livewell and bilge on land. Drain all the water you
can from your engine. Also, inspect your vessel and trailer,
removing any visible mussels, but also feel for any rough or gritty
spots on the hull. These may be young mussels that can be hard to
see.

For more information, go to the Arizona Game and Fish
Department’s web pages at www.azgfd.gov or visit
http://100thmeridian.org/.

WILLOW BEACH – Willow beach is stocked every Friday with 3,000
13-inch rainbow trout. Garlic and salmon peach Power Baits were
being used most for trout. Power Worms, jakes, Panther Martin and
Rooster Tails are also usually effective. Construction near the
river is mostly complete and the new store and parking lots are
open.

Important notice: With the discovery of invasive quagga mussels
in Mead, Mohave and Havasu, proper cleaning of all watercraft is
critical to help prevent the spread of these invaders. Please drain
and dry your livewell and bilge on land. Drain all the water you
can from your engine. Also, inspect your vessel and trailer,
removing any visible mussels, but also feel for any rough or gritty
spots on the hull. These may be young mussels that can be hard to
see. If you fish Willow beach and are having luck, please e-mail me
at mchmiel@azgfd.gov so I can share your successes with others.

For more information, go to the Arizona Game and Fish
Department’s web pages at www.azgfd.gov or visit
http://100thmeridian.org/.

TOPOCK MARSH – Bass, crappie and catfish are all biting, but the
bite can be hit and miss. Several crappies have tipped the scale at
just over 2 pounds. Minnows and small road runners are the
preferred bait. Bass bite has taken off. Arizona Game and Fish
Department is currently doing a creel survey on the marsh. Two
weeks ago a local fisherman caught over 30 largemouth bass with 5
fish over the 13 inch minimum length and the week before he caught
a 21 lb. channel catfish. He uses black, white or red spinner
baits. Pumpkin colored crankbait and six inch watermelon trick
worms are working in shallow water. In deeper water it is deep
diving crank baits in a fire tiger color that is producing.

You can access the marsh by boat at the North Dike, Catfish
Paradise, and Five-Mile Landing. All three also provide plenty of
area for shoreline fishing too. For more information on the marsh,
contact the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge at (760) 326-3853 or go
to
http://www.fws.gov/southwest/refuges/arizona/havasu/index.html.

Important notice: With the discovery of invasive quagga mussels
in Mead, Mohave and Havasu, proper cleaning of all watercraft is
critical to help prevent the spread of these invaders. Please drain
and dry your livewell and bilge on land. Drain all the water you
can from your engine. Also, inspect your vessel and trailer,
removing any visible mussels, but also feel for any rough or gritty
spots on the hull. These may be young mussels that can be hard to
see.

For more information, go to the Arizona Game and Fish
Department’s web pages at www.azgfd.gov or visit
http://100thmeridian.org/.

COLORADO RIVER BELOW DAVIS DAM – Trout were last stocked the
week of March 8, which was the last stocking at Davis Camp until
October of 2011.

In addition to the stockers multiple anglers have been reporting
catching trout in the 20-22 inch range on night crawlers. Rainbow
trout are stocked by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service monthly
during the winter. The fish are normally stocked in two locations;
Davis Camp and near The Riverside. Trout fishing at the stocking
sites is great immediately following the stockings, then the fish
move out and you need to find them. Rainbow trout are located
throughout the river below Davis dam, but anglers typically report
catching trout on the Arizona side across from the Riverside, off
the shore of Davis Camp and in the big bend area. This year we have
received multiple reports of larger holdover trout being caught.
Remember to fish for trout, you need a trout stamp on Class A and
Lifetime fishing licenses.

Topock Gorge has seen up to 2-pound smallmouth but not very many
taken. Strippers are not biting but the trout are moving down and
being caught on night crawlers. A 3 ¼ pound catfish was taken
recently but in general it has taken a variety of baits to catch
the few fish that have been caught.

Water levels on the river fluctuate, so be careful. You can
check the Bureau of Reclamation Web site for flow predictions
http://www.usbr.gov/lc/riverops.html before you go. If you fish the
river below Davis Dam and are having luck, please e-mail me at
mchmiel@azgfd.gov so I can share your successes with others.

SOUTHWESTERN WATERS

Note: If you have a fishing report, send it to “Been Fishing?” at
bfishing@azgfd.gov

LAKE HAVASU — Picture on the left is a 34-pound striped bass
weighing 34 pounds measuring 42 inches long with a 27-inch girth
caught by George Lloyd of Lake Havasu

using a Luckycraft Pointer 128 lure on April 19 at 6:30a.m.

Photo by: John Galbraith of BassTackleMaster.com

Lake Havasu Fishing Report: Lake Level 448.8. Stripers hitting
topwater and shallowrunning lures like the Pointer 128s in Pearl
threadfin shad & Chartreuse Shad. Best topwaters are Kobes,
Super Spooks or Pencil Poppers.

Local angler George Lloyd caught a 34lb Striper on Tuesday
trolling a Pointer 128 near where the shad are spawing on the
shoreline in the early AM hours. He landed the bass at 6:30am, so
get out early and get in on this great first hour of daylight.

Threadfin shad only spawn only during the fist hour of daylight
(this will last only 2 weeks).

Stripers are spawning now as well.

Best time is 9am to 3pm when the stripers school up in the old
river channel to spawn in large groups. Cut anchovies work great
during this time as stripers will bite during spawning. Evening
bite is slow for stripers but great for catfish using squid or
anchovies.

Laremouth bass in full spawn now. Use dropshotted Roboworms or
Tubes (Gitzits) to catch these spawning bass. Topwater action is
starting now with some post spawn bass aggressively striking
topwater plugs like

frogs, spooks, poppers and buzzbaits.

Please practice catch and release during this spawning time to
give our bass a chance to reproduce and make our fishery even
better.

This Report was provided by John Galbraith of BassTackleMaster.com,
Lake Havasu City, Az.

Spring Outlook for Lower Colorado River and Alamo Lake

ALAMO LAKE — Lake has received no significant runoff this
winter, but the lake elevation remains at a pretty respectable
level, around 1118 feet. This means that both launch ramps at Alamo
Lake State Park should remain usable for the foreseeable future.
Inflow events are still a possibility as we go into the spring, but
for the past three years our major inflow events have occurred
prior to March. Regardless, the flows in the past three winters
have provided an influx of nutrients into the system, so the fish
populations in the reservoir should be in very good shape.

Largemouth bass surveys conducted by AZGFD in October indicate that
bass are still very abundant, although a large proportion of the
population remains in the protected slot. We continue to see a
gradual increase in numbers of bass that are greater than 16
inches, but slot-sized fish are still the most numerous. This past
fall, the bass were in average physical condition for Alamo Lake,
but the decent shad and small sunfish numbers hopefully has allowed
them to fatten, over the winter. Bass fishing should be good to
excellent, as is usual for Alamo, into the summer. Be aware that
heavy runoff inflows, if they occur, can dump a lot of debris into
the lake, which effects water clarity, and can turn off the bite.
There is also the chance of larger floating debris, which can
present a boating hazard. The upper end of Alamo Lake has a lot of
dead standing vegetation and debris, often just below the water
surface. This is great cover for fish, but presents a hazard to
boating. Be aware that there are no navigational hazard markers at
the upper portion of the lake, once you pass the second buoy line.
For bass, as the weather warms, shift from slowly working plastics
in deeper water to crank baits, spinner baits, and top-water
lures.

Fishing for channel catfish will be good to excellent this spring,
and throughout the summer. There is a very healthy population of
channel catfish in Alamo Lake. There are lots of very small
catfish, but plenty in the 2-4 pound range that provide fun
fishing. You may also run into the occasional 8-10 pound catfish.
The best concentrations of channel catfish seem to be found along
the upper two thirds of the shoreline, on the western side of the
lake. For channel catfish any of the prepared catfish baits will
work, as well as chicken livers, or your own secret concoctions.
Channel catfish will occasionally take artificial lures and
plastics, but if you are targeting catfish, bait is probably the
way to go. Crappie fishing has been pretty decent through the
winter, and may pick up a bit as the weather warms. Large bags have
not been common, but the fish are of high quality, in the 1½- to
2-pound range. There are other fish present such as bluegill,
redear sunfish and carp that are a lot of fun to catch. When Alamo
Lake was first formed, it was well known for its excellent
pan-fishing. In the past couple of years we have been noticing that
decent-sized sunfish are on the increase. Increased harvest on
these species would actually result in larger average sizes, and
you cannot beat sunfish for edibility. We have been seeing an
abundance of decent-sized redear sunfish, up to a pound. This
species commonly reaches sizes of over two pounds, although we have
not yet observed redear sunfish of this size in Alamo Lake. All
types of bait should work. Large tilapia in the 5-6 pound range are
abundant, and are an unexploited resource.

The State Park, and all of its facilities, is open, and we expect
all amenities to remain available. Because of the State’s budget
woes, which have severely impacted operation of Arizona State
Parks, some change in operation could occur in the future, but for
now the operation of the Park has not changed. The store at the
lake is open, where you can get ice, snacks, fishing tackle and
bait, as well as information on the fishing. A certified scale is
located at the store. No fuel is available at Alamo Lake, it is
sold at Wenden, and nearby Wayside.

LAKE HAVASU & TOPOCK GORGE — Lake Havasu and the river
upstream of the lake is becoming an excellent destination for
largemouth and smallmouth bass. Fishing for largemouth bass, as
well as smallmouth bass, is expected to be good to excellent this
spring. There is a 13-inch minimum size limit for bass on the lower
Colorado River.

Largemouth bass in the four to six pound range are becoming very
common on Lake Havasu, with occasional fish exceeding 10
pounds.

Smallmouth bass are becoming more and more common, and bags at
bass tournaments are now showing close to a 50/50 mix of largemouth
and smallmouth bass. If you are unfamiliar with smallmouth bass,
they are very aggressive and scrappy, and will give you a much more
exciting battle than a similarly-sized largemouth. Smallmouth bass
generally do not grow as large as largemouth, but four and
five-pound smallmouth are becoming common.

Both bass species tend to be in very good condition in this
water body. Perhaps because of the exceptionally clear water in
Lake Havasu, they are also some of the most strikingly colored fish
in the Region. The warmer weather should cause the bite to improve,
making crankbaits and topwater lures a good choice as the water
warms.

Striped bass fishing will likely continue to be fair to poor, with
catch rates far below what have been experienced in past years.
Striped bass are very dependent on threadfin shad for forage. Shad
numbers appear to be on the increase, but all reports indicate that
striper-fishing has not seen a dramatic comeback, nor do we have
terribly high expectations that it will.

Remember, schools of shad move around, and populations tend to
fluctuate, so spots that have been “hot” in the past may no longer
be so if the shad have moved elsewhere, or are in lower numbers.
Historically, the majority of striped bass in Lake Havasu tend to
be smaller fish of 1 to 2 pounds, with an occasional 20-30 pound
fish. It seems that the smaller fish are much more uncommon than
they were several years ago. The jury is still out on the effects
the quagga mussel infestation in Lake Havasu may have on the fish
community in Lake Havasu, but the arrival of the mussel has seemed
to coincide with a decrease in the catch rates for striped bass.
Live shad seems to be the most productive bait for stripers, with
cut anchovies not seeming to work as well as they did in years
past.

Angling for bluegill and redear sunfish will be good to excellent.
Lake Havasu is well known for large (2-3 pound) redear sunfish, and
with the proliferation of the quagga mussel in the lake, we are
seeing large redears becoming more common. Redear sunfish are also
known as “shell crackers,” due to their preference, and
morphological adaptation, for eating clams and mussels, so they may
actually benefit from the presence of the invasive quagga mussel.
Bluegills will also eat quagga mussels, although they are not as
well adapted for capitalizing on this suddenly abundant food
source. Redear sunfish up to four pounds (or even larger) are found
in the lake. Decent crappie numbers can be found, primarily in the
lower end of the lake (Bill Williams River Arm), but fishing for
crappie is likely to be only fair.

Threadfin shad are also an important food source for crappie,
and the abundance of this species hinges on the size of the shad
population. Flathead catfish can be found throughout the lake, but
the larger individual, up to 40 pounds, or greater, can be found in
the lower portion of the lake, especially in the Bill Williams
River arm. Fishing for flatheads should improve as the water warms
this spring. Live bait is the key for flatheads, as they are
extremely predatory and are unlikely to strike much other than a
lively bait fish. Channel catfish are also found throughout the
lake, and they will take a variety of live bait, cut bait and
commercial preparations.

Take precautions to make sure your boat and equipment is clean
before leaving the water to make sure you don’t spread quagga
mussels to other waters by accident. This invasive species
certainly has profound effects on water delivery and control
structures, boat engines, and likely on fish populations. Quagga
mussels are abundant and widely distributed in Lake Havasu, but are
absent from many of our interior lakes, and lakes in California.
Help keep those lakes quagga-free. Do the right thing, and make
sure your boat and trailer are free of the mussels; drain your
bilge and livewell before leaving the area, and most importantly,
let your boat bake in the sun before you launch it at another lake.
New regulations pertaining to the quagga mussel are now in effect
for Lake Havasu and other infected waters, so make sure you follow
those rules if you are transporting your boat. See Director’s Order
3, below, for specific requirements about moving your boat from
Lake Havasu, or any other quagga infested waters in Arizona.
http://www.azgfd.gov/h_f/documents/DirectorsOrder3_2011A.pdf.

COLORADO RIVER (PARKER STRIP AREA) — Fishing for smallmouth bass
over two pounds in size is expected to be good to excellent. In
addition, redear sunfish should also be good in the pound-plus
sizes. The Parker Strip is well known for its smallmouth bass
fishing, especially in the area from the dam to several miles
downstream. The Parker Strip is also home to some really
impressive, dinner-plate sized redear sunfish of two pounds or
larger. Channel and flathead catfish fishing is always fair in this
section of the Colorado River. Below the dam, striper fishing
should also be fair, using live shad or anchovies. Largemouth bass
are abundant, especially in the downstream portions of the Parker
Strip. Channel and flathead catfish fishing will be fair to good in
this section of the Colorado River as the weather warms up.

Take precautions to make sure your boat and equipment is clean
before leaving the water to make sure you don’t spread quagga
mussels to other water by accident.

COLORADO RIVER (BETWEEN PALO VERDE DIVERSION DAM AND WALTER’S CAMP)
— This area should be fair for both smallmouth bass (in the
channel) up river from the I-10 Bridge and largemouth bass (in the
backwaters) throughout the entire area. Channel and flathead
catfish are always fair to good in this section of the Colorado
River. Most of the flathead catfish will be in the 2 to 5 pound
size range with an occasional fish over 40 pounds. Flathead catfish
surveys last May yielded a handful of fish between 15 and 50 pounds
in this section of the river, although the majority of fish were
much smaller. The time for fishing for both species of catfish will
be late spring and throughout the summer. Generally, when fishing
for catfish, the hotter the weather, the better the fishing. Lively
bait is the key to successful flathead fishing. Using the largest
baitfish you can come by will increase the odds of catching a
larger flathead.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is
where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is
located. Quagga mussels are also found here. If using a boat, make
sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before
leaving the area.

COLORADO RIVER (BETWEEN WALTER’S CAMP AND PICACHO STATE PARK) —
This section of the Colorado River is relatively remote and can
only be accessed by boat from either end. Fishing is expected to be
good to excellent for flathead catfish with sizes over 40 pounds.
The best time will be late spring and on into the summer (the
hotter the better). Backwaters are somewhat limited in this stretch
of the river, but the few that are there will be good for
largemouth bass and other sunfish (bluegill, redear and
occasionally black crappie). Channel catfish are also very numerous
in this section of the river. Smaller numbers of smallmouth bass
and striped bass also occur.

The invasive vegetative species, giant salvinia, as well as quagga
mussels, are found in this stretch of the river. If using a boat,
make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean
before leaving the area.

COLORADO RIVER (BETWEEN PICACHO STATE PARK AND IMPERIAL DAM) —
This area is expected to be good to excellent for largemouth bass,
channel catfish, and flathead catfish. Bass and channel catfish in
excess of 5 pounds are present along with flathead catfish as large
as 40 pounds not uncommon, occasionally much larger. There is
definitely a state record or two lurking in these waters. Only very
heavy fishing tackle will suffice for the really large fish.
Bluegills, redear sunfish and black crappie are also present in the
various backwaters. Occasional striped bass will be caught in the
channels connecting backwaters and the main river channel.
Smallmouth bass seem to be on the increase in the lower river above
Imperial Dam. They generally prefer swifter water and rockier
substrate than largemouth bass, and certainly aren’t as numerous,
but they are very aggressive and very scrappy fighters and well
worth seeking out.

The invasive vegetative species, giant salvinia, as well as quagga
mussels, are found in this stretch of the river. If using a boat,
make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean
before leaving the area.

COLORADO RIVER (BETWEEN LAGUNA AND MORELOS DAMS) — This area will
be good for largemouth bass and flathead catfish. Bass in excess of
5 pounds are common and flathead catfish over 20 pounds are a good
bet. In this area, accessibility to the river is dependent on the
amount of water being released. Usually shallow draft boats are a
must. The lower end has had some dredging work done and a larger
boat may be able to get on the river in that area. Be aware that
some sections of the river are within Quechan tribal boundaries,
and a tribal permit is required to fish there. Boundaries are not
well marked, so doing some research prior to fishing this section
may prevent hassles while you are out there.

The invasive vegetative species, giant salvinia, as well as quagga
mussels, are found in this stretch of the river. If using a boat,
make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean
before leaving the area.

With the increase in border issues and illegal activity on the
lower end of this stretch, we recommend exercising extreme caution,
avoiding nighttime use, or even staying away from the area
altogether (Pilot Knob to Morelos Dam).

MITTRY LAKE — Mittry Lake is located just above Laguna Dam, and
supports a good population of largemouth bass and channel catfish,
and even some good-sized flathead catfish. There are shoreline
fishing opportunities at this lake in the form of about a dozen
rock jetties, but you’ll probably have the best success in a small
boat. Mittry Lake can be frustrating, as the bite seems to be real
variable, but the fish are there. It is just a question of getting
them to respond to your presentation. The water tends to be very
murky most of the year, except for the upper end of Teal Alley
where the lake inflow comes in, so play to the fish’s sense of
hearing and smell, rather than sight. There are also crappie and
sunfish to be caught, although they tend to average relatively
small in size. Mittry Lake is well-known locally for the quality
largemouth bass it produces, and fishing during the spring spawn
will increase your chances of success.

YUMA AREA PONDS — The Department has stepped up efforts to
encourage the recruitment of new anglers, and retention of existing
ones. To this end, the Department has increased stocking efforts in
a few ponds in the Yuma area that are easily accessed without a
boat, within a short distance of the urban center. Those ponds are
the Yuma West Wetlands pond, located in the City Park, and Redondo
and Fortuna ponds, located about 10 miles northeast of Yuma. Access
to Redondo Pond was recently improved with the addition of an ADA
compliant fishing pier, and thick cattail growth was removed at
Fortuna Pond this summer, improving shoreline access by many orders
of magnitude. All of these waters received multiple stockings of
rainbow trout in the winter months; Redondo Pond will be stocked
with channel catfish during the spring, and the Yuma West Wetlands
pond will receive channel catfish and bluegills. We may be able to
stock Fortuna Pond with channel catfish in the future, pending the
outcome of the statewide sport-fish stocking consultation with the
USFWS that is hopefully nearing completion. Depending on available
funding, we hope to continue regular stockings into all three of
these shoreline-accessible waters, and perhaps add additional
waters to our stocking schedule. These ponds provide an ideal place
to take the family. All three waters now are provided with restroom
and trash facilities. Special regulations on fish limits are in
effect for these waters, so be sure to consult the Regulations
before you take fish.

REGIONAL HOT SPOTS — Alamo Lake will continue to be a hot spot for
plentiful largemouth bass and channel catfish, although
trophy-sized fish will be uncommon. Lake Havasu is probably
currently the premier lake in our Region (and perhaps the State)
for largemouth bass, smallmouth bass and redear sunfish. Numbers
caught will likely be lower, but the quality of the fish much
higher. The Parker Strip should remain excellent for smallmouth
bass and redear sunfish, and the Colorado River below Walter’s Camp
down to Imperial Dam the best bet for large and plentiful flathead
catfish. Our spring surveys indicate that there is a very
impressive population of flathead catfish in the lower Imperial
Division between Picacho State Park and Imperial Dam. Expect many
in the 5-10 pounds size class, but we know of at least one state
record lurking in those waters. Backwaters in the Imperial Division
above Imperial Dam will continue to yield impressive largemouth
bass, up to and exceeding 10 pounds.

If you need any additional information or assistance, don’t
hesitate to contact the Yuma Regional office at (928) 342-0091, and
we will be happy to give you whatever information we have. A very
good resource for local fishing information in the Yuma area is the
website and forum at www.yumabassman.com.

CENTRAL MOUNTAINS

Note: Expected storms this week could affect access to some of the
higher elevation waters or make dirt roads to others wet and muddy,
so always check on road conditions before going.

Fossil Creek is open for fishing until the end of April. The creek
is managed as a catch-and-release fishery using flies and lures
with single barbless hooks

WILLIAMS LAKES:

KAIBAB LAKE – Campground is closed. No report. Has been
stocked

CATARACT LAKE – Campground is closed. Scheduled to be stocked this
week with rainbow trout.

CITY RESERVOIR – No report.

DOGTOWN LAKE – Campground is closed. Scheduled to be stocked with
rainbows this week

JD DAM – Had an angler report that he did well on woolly
buggers.

RUSSELL TANK – The lake is to shallow to stock.

SANTA FE – No Report. Has been stocked

WHITEHORSE LAKE – Campground is closed. Scheduled to be stocked
this week

FLAGSTAFF LAKES:

LOWER LAKE MARY – Anglers have been catching some nice size
rainbows and quite a few small pike late in the day. Stocked last
week

UPPER LAKE MARY – Northern pike and yellow perch should be active
right now, but we haven’t received any reports.

Angler Report:

Spent 7 consecutive hours on Lake Mary today……very windy,
gusts to 40mph, 65f….but the boat was stable, had a great
time…..even had lunch on the boat (Roast Beef Sandwich)….

Troy came up for the day from Camp Verde….he caught a few, I got
a couple….including of all things, a Crappie! (Pic E07)….

Garrett

 

ASHURST LAKE – Stocked last week

FRANCIS SHORT POND – Stocked last week.

KINNIKINICK LAKE – No report.

MARSHALL LAKE – No report

OAK CREEK – No report. Scheduled to be stocked this week

LONG LAKE – No report. Scheduled to be stocked this week with
rainbow trout. This lake also has northern pike and some
walleye.

SOLDIERS & SOLDIERS ANNEX – No report

BEAVER CREEK – No report.

WEST CLEAR CREEK – Was scheduled for stocking this week.

STONEMAN LAKE – NO FISH.

If you need any additional information or assistance, don’t
hesitate to contact the Yuma Regional office at (928) 342-0091, and
we will be happy to give you whatever information we have. A very
good resource for local fishing information in the Yuma area is the
website and forum at www.yumabassman.com.

BLUE RIDGE – Has been open and accessible. .

Angler report:

Water level is high and the water is clear. The road in is muddy in
spots and there is still some snow. The boat launch looks to be in
good shape, no major ruts or rocks.

I caught and released 6 rainbow trout (8″-14″) in 4 hours.
Caught 3 in 20 minutes!

Rapala Countdown Minnow (silver) provided outstanding results (5
of the 6 fish). Three inch (white) Power Grub six feet under slip
bobber provided the other trout.

If you love Blue Ridge as much as we do, please take a bag to
pick up trash and discarded line.

Good luck and have fun!

Greg

(Flagstaff)

KNOLL LAKE – The FR 300 is open on the Coconino National Forest
side, but not from the Woods Canyon Lake side. No reports from
anglers.

Verde Valley

DEAD HORSE STATE PARK – The last trout stocking was the week of
March 7. Fishing is usually great following the stocking. Power
Bait or homemade dough baits are your best bet this time of
year.

Catfish were last stocked the week of September 20.

VERDE RIVER (throughout Verde Valley) – The last trout stocking was
the week of March 7. Stocking sites were at Tuzigoot Bridge outside
of Clarkdale, The bridge that leads to the Deadhorse State Park, at
Deadhorse State Parks access point called the Jacks, at the White
Bridge in Camp Verde, and at Bignotti Beach. Always check your
regulations before fishing this area with live bait. Game and Fish
Commission Rule requires anglers to only use live bait that has
been caught in the river. No transporting of live baitfish or
crayfish is allowed.

BEAVER CREEK – Stocked in early March. Fishing might be decent in
the isolated pools upstream.

WEST CLEAR CREEK – Scheduled for stocking this week.

FOSSIL CREEK — This unique catch-and-release, artificial lure
with barbless hook only fishing for roundtail chub fishery will
come to an end April 30. If you go, please help out and take an
extra trash bag; some folks aren’t as respectful of the land as
anglers are.

Prescott Area

FAIN LAKE -Fain Lake is closed while it is being dredged. Stocking
will be canceled until the dredging is completed. The surplus fish
that would normally be going into Fain will be stocked in Watson
Lake at the new boat launch. Power bait and spinners will likely be
your best bet. Try Watson while Fain is closed. Fain will likely be
finished and open by the beginning of June.

GOLDWATER LAKE – Trout fishing was good following the last
stocking. The next trout stocking is scheduled for the week of May
9. The handicapped parking area and boat launch or open for now. A
pair of anglers reported catching 6 fish between them in just 1
hour. Others have not been as lucky. The fishing can be really good
at Goldwater this time of year. Hold-overs are not uncommon. Look
for the fishing to pick up following the stocking.

Game and Fish has been trying to boost the some of the warm
water species in Goldwater. Bass and catfish have been stocked
three times over the last three years. The bass are being stocked
to give a boost to a dwindling population in the lake and to reduce
the excessive number of crayfish. Please practice catch and release
with the bass, while the population gets re-established.

If you fish Goldwater and are having luck, please e-mail me at
mchmiel@azgfd.gov so I can share your successes with others.

GRANITE BASIN LAKE – As the water warms the bite should increase
for largemouth, bluegill and catfish. If you fish Granite Basin and
are having luck, please e-mail me at mchmiel@azgfd.gov so I can
share your successes with others.

LYNX LAKE – The next trout stocking is scheduled for the week of
May 9. Trout can be caught on Power Bait, corn, Power Worms, Jakes,
Panther Martin and Rooster Tails, just to name a few.

Brook trout, catfish and bluegill were all stocked the last
spring. Cut anchovies, night crawlers or hot dog are your best bet
for catfish. Lynx can be difficult to fish, if you are not catching
anything try moving to a new spot. There are some good spots on the
north end of the lake that don’t get fished as heavily as the south
end does.

MINGUS LAKE – Trout are scheduled to be stocked this week, the
week of April 18. The gate to Mingus Lake is locked. If you choose
to walk in, the water level is up and fishing should be good
following the stocking. The best bait is usually orange, pink, or
white Power Bait, fished on the bottom with a treble hook and an
egg sinker. Fishing can be really good at times, because angler use
is lower than other lakes in the area. This lake is more remote
than the other Prescott area lakes and not very big. Trout stocking
will resume in the spring.

Someone illegally stocked yellow bullhead into Mingus several
years ago. These fish compete directly with the trout and keep
growth rates very low. If you witness anyone, anywhere, moving fish
like bass, bluegill, catfish and stocking them, please report it to
our Operation Game Thief Hotline at 1-800-352-0700. Illegal
stockings cost YOU money!

WATSON – Watson Lake was stocked with 8,250 Rainbow on March 30.
More than 13,000 rainbow trout have been stocked since January into
Watson Lake. Prior to the January stocking Game and Fish had not
stocked trout here since 1962.

Some anglers have reported having great success in the last
week. Limiting out in as little as 30 minutes, while other anglers
have reported not catching a thing while watching the fish feeding
in the distance. There is no shortage of trout in the lake, if you
are not having success try using something different or a new
location at the lake, but don’t give up. Power bait, spinners, and
flies will be your best bet. Watson is surrounded by large boulders
limiting shore access to less agile anglers. Fishing from a boat
may improve your odds of success. Remember, while Watson Lake has
no motor restrictions, it is flat wake only.

Game and Fish Biologists surveyed Watson last fall and found the
bass, sunfish, and bullhead to be plentiful. Crappies were also
doing well. Look for the crappie fishing to pick up in a year or
two. If you fish Watson and are having luck, please e-mail me at
mchmiel@azgfd.gov so I can share your successes with others.

WILLOW CREEK RESERVOIR – As the water warms, the bite for all
species will increase. The bass should be spawning soon, but the
last cold front may have delayed it.

If you fish Willow and are having luck, please e-mail me at
mchmiel@azgfd.gov so I can share your successes with others.

 

Mogollon Rim and White Mountains

Note: If you have a fishing report, send it to “Been Fishing?” at
bfishing@azgfd.gov

Recommended waters to fish:

Fool Hollow Lake, Show Low Lake, and Scott Reservoir are the best
opportunities in the Show Low/Pinetop-Lakeside area. Pike are
staging for the spawn at Rainbow Lake.

Becker Lake, Luna Lake, the Greer Lakes, and Nelson Reservoir in
the Springerville and Alpine areas are ice-free with anglers
beginning to catch some rainbow trout.

Willow Springs Lake and Black Canyon Lake are producing some larger
hold-over trout. For fly anglers, Chevelon Lake has been
overflowing. It’s a hike-in, float-tube special for larger
hold-over trout.

MOGOLLON RIM LAKES

Note: All of the Rim Lakes are now ice-free; however, the Rim Road
(FR 300) at the junction of FR105 at Woods Canyon Lake is still
closed due to snowdrifts and muddy conditions and is scheduled to
open around May 15, making Bear Canyon Lake our one access hold out
right now.

Trout stocking scheduled for the week of April 11-15:

Rainbow Lake 1,730

Fool Hollow Lake 1,730

Tunnel Reservoir 1,869

Black Canyon Lake 1,751

Trout stocking scheduled for the week of April 18-22:

Bunch Reservoir 2,595

River 2,162

BEAR CANYON LAKE – The lake is ice-free and full, not
accessible. Forest Road 300 is closed at the Junction of Forest
Road 105 to Woods Canyon Lake. The road may open up around mid May,
depending on snow melt.

BLACK CANYON LAKE – Fishing is fair to good. The lake is ice free.
The lake was stocked last week with catchable size rainbow trout.
Forest Roads 300 and 86 are open to the lake. Recent netting
revealed holdover rainbow trout ranging from 12 to 19 inches and
largemouth bass ranging from 12 to 16 inches.

BLUE RIDGE – Has been open and accessible. Fishing should be
good.

Angler report:

Water level is high and the water is clear. The road in is muddy in
spots and there is still some snow. The boat launch looks to be in
good shape, no major ruts or rocks.

I caught and released 6 rainbow trout (8″-14″) in 4 hours.
Caught 3 in 20 minutes!

Rapala Countdown Minnow (silver) provided outstanding results (5
of the 6 fish). Three inch (white) Power Grub six feet under slip
bobber provided the other trout.

If you love Blue Ridge as much as we do, please take a bag to
pick up trash and discarded line.

Good luck and have fun!

Greg

(Flagstaff)

CHEVELON LAKE – Fishing is fair to good. The lake is ice-free, full
and spilling. Forest Road 300 is still closed due to snowdrifts,
but the lake can be accessed from Forest Road 504 from Heber, then
north on Forest Road 169. Forest Road 300 is scheduled to open on
May 15. When the lake is spilling like this, the creek below the
lake can provide good fishing as well.

KNOLL LAKE – The FR 300 is open on the Coconino National Forest
side, but not from the Woods Canyon Lake side. No reports from
anglers. Fishing should be fairly decent for the larger hold-over
trout, but catch rates might start off a little slow until the
water warms a few degrees and the trout get into higher activity
patterns.

WILLOW SPRINGS LAKE – The lake is ice-free. Fishing is fair.
Anglers are catching some holdover trout (11-14 inch rainbow trout)
on red Power Bait and worms. Forest Road 149 is open to the lake.
The water temperature last weekend was 52 degrees. All campgrounds
are open.

WOODS CANYON LAKE – Fishing is fair. Anglers are catching some
rainbow trout (11-14 inches) on worms and Power Bait. The lake is
ice free. Forest Road 300 will be open around May 15.

The gate near the store and to the Dam will be closed until road
repairs are completed.

Access to the boat ramp and parking lot will remain closed for
the interim. It is a ¼ mile hike to the lake. The water temperature
last weekend was 54 degrees. The store is open and boat rentals are
available. There are also two campgrounds open.

WHITE MOUNTAIN LAKES

Note: All lakes in the White Mountains are now ice-free. Interior
Forest Roads are open but may have wet conditions so drive safely.
Highways 261 and 273 are open. Highway 273 at Sunrise Lake to a
little past Forest Road 87 is still gravel so drive safely.

BECKER LAKE – The lake is ice-free. Fishing is fair to good. Fly
Fishers recently reported catching some nice sized trout (up to 22
inches) on midges and small nymphs. New fishing regulations took
effect on Becker Lake Jan. 1, 2011. The new regulations are
catch-and-release fishing for trout with artificial lure and fly
with a single barbless hook only. All trout must be released
immediately. The water temperature last week was 52 degrees.

BIG LAKE – Fishing is good. Anglers have been catching trout on
worms, Power Bait, and lures. The lake is ice-free. Highways 261
and 273 are open. The store is open and boat rentals are available.
The Lake is ice free. The water temperature last week was 43
degrees.

Here is an update from the Big Lake Store: Fishing has been real
good. They are biting on salmon eggs, power bait and worms. Also
Z-rays, Rooster Tails and Panther Martins are doing real well from
the boats. The average size has been running approximately 12
inches. I have seen up to 3 pounds.

Also, it looks like Crescent Lake has come through the winter in
good shape. We are starting to see some nice looking fish from
Crescent.

The Big Lake Store is open and renting boats. The store number
is (928) 521-1387. Thank you very much for your weekly reports.

You are doing a great job!

Sincerely, Rick Law

CARNERO LAKE – Fishing is good. The lake is ice-free and did NOT
have a winter fish kill. Fly Fishers are catching trout on small
nymphs. Forest Roads 117 and 117A are open.

CLEAR CREEK RESERVOIR – Fishing is poor. The lake is
ice-free.

CONCHO LAKE – Fishing has been poor. The water temperature last
week was 55 degrees.

CRESCENT LAKE -Fishing is fair to good. The lake is ice-free and
did NOT have a winter fish kill. Highways 261 and 273 are open. The
store is still closed. The water temperature last week was 41
degrees.

FOOL HOLLOW LAKE – Fishing is fair to good. The lake was stocked
with rainbow trout last week. The lake is ice-free and full.
Anglers have been catching trout and small walleyes on night
crawlers and lures.

Black crappies should be staging around the west side fishing
piers. Try small crappie jigs, worms, and mealworms.

Recent netting surveys revealed lots of nice sized channel
catfish, walleyes, bass, and northern pike. Some nice sized black
crappies were also taken. The water temperature last week was 51
degrees.

GREER LAKES – Fishing for wild brown trout and carryover rainbows
is fair. All of the Greer lakes (River, Tunnel, and Bunch) are
ice-free and full. The paved roads to these lakes are clear and dry
(easy access).

Tunnel was stocked with catch able rainbow trout last week.

Bunch and River Reservoir will be stocked this week.

Recent netting at River Reservoir revealed brown trout ranging
from 10 to 25 inches and holdover rainbow trout ranging from 13 to
15 inches. The water temperature last week at Bunch Reservoir was
47 degrees, Tunnel Reservoir was 49 degrees, and River Reservoir
was 47 degrees.

HULSEY LAKE – Fishing is fair. Anglers have been catching some
carryover rainbow trout on night crawlers. The lake is ice-free.
Forest Road 56 is open. The water temperature last week was 50
degrees.

LEE VALLEY RESERVOIR – Fishing is fair. The lake is ice-free and
low but did NOT have a winter fish kill. Highways 261 and 273 are
open. The water temperature last week was 43 degrees.

LUNA LAKE – The lake is ice-free and full. Fishing is fair to good.
Anglers are catching trout on lures such as spinners and spoons
(KastMasters and Z-Rays), woolly worms, woolly buggers, Power Bait
(pink), salmon eggs, corn, and night crawlers. The concession store
is open on weekends. They are renting canoes and paddle boats, but
not motorboats until May. The water temperature last week was 48
degrees.

LYMAN LAKE – Lyman Lake State Park is currently closed. Local
authorities are working to re-open the park this summer, but
nothing is definite.

NELSON RESERVOIR – The lake is ice-free and full. Fishing is good
to excellent. Anglers have been catching holdover rainbow trout on
night crawlers, corn, and green Power Bait. The current bag and
possession limit at Nelson is 6 trout. Recent netting revealed high
numbers of rainbow trout measuring 12-14 inches, some black
crappies up to 13 inches, and green sunfish up to 8 inches. The
water temperature last week was 51 degrees.

RAINBOW LAKE – The lake is ice-free, full, and barely spilling.
Fishing is fair to good. The lake was stocked last week with 1,730
rainbow trout. The pike are no longer spawning and will be found
anywhere in the lake. The water temperature last week was 50
degrees.

SCOTT RESERVOIR – The lake is ice-free, full, and spilling. Fishing
is fair to good. The lake was stocked with 2,487 rainbow trout last
week. A couple of anglers recently caught several large holdover
trout from the boat ramp. The water temperature last week was 51
degrees.

SHOW LOW LAKE – The lake is ice-free. Fishing fair to good. The
lake was stocked with 4,757 rainbow trout last week. The store is
still closed. The water temperature last week was 49 degrees.

WOODLAND LAKE – The lake is ice-free, full, and spilling. Fishing
is good. Anglers have been catching trout on small spinners
(Panther Martin). The lake was stocked with 2,055 rainbow trout
last week. The water temperature last week was 52 degrees.

WHITE MOUNTAIN STREAMS

Note: Some interior Forest Roads are open. Highways 261 and 273 are
open.

EAST FORK BLACK RIVER -Fishing is fair for wild browns. The stream
is accessible by way of Forest Road 26 from Highway 191, then north
on Forest Road 24, or by way of Forest Road 249 from Alpine. The
East Fork did not get much of a snowmelt runoff and is already
fairly clear and near base flow. Stocking is scheduled to begin in
May.

LITTLE COLORADO RIVER – GREER – The stream is accessible in and
upstream from Greer. Spring runoff was poor and has appeared to
have ended. The flows are near base flow. Fishing is fair until the
stream is stocked in May.

SHEEPS CROSSING – The stream is accessible. Highway 273 is open.
Fishing will likely be poor to fair until the stream is stocked in
May.

SILVER CREEK – Fishing is fair to good. Fishing regulations changed
on April 1. Anglers can use flies, lures, and bait, and the bag and
possession limit is 6 trout. Anglers have been catching trout on
worms, Power Bait, lures (spinners), and flies. The upper section
is closed to fishing.

WEST FORK BLACK RIVER – The lower reaches of the stream are
accessible from Buffalo Crossing on Forest Road 25. The flow is
likely near base flow. The spring runoff was very poor and appears
to have ended. Fishing is fair until the stream is stocked in
May.

SOUTHERN ARIZONA

Please send fishing reports from this region to Don Mitchell,
Regional Fish Program Manager, by email at dmitchell@azgfd.gov.
These reports will then be complied and reported in our weekly
fishing reports.

No new reports this week. The fall/winter trout stocking schedule
can be found at
http://www.azgfd.gov/h_f/stocking_schedule.shtml.

As air temperatures begin to warm anglers can expect the sunfish
and bass to become more active. Anglers should focus their efforts
to areas along the shoreline as fish move into shallower water to
begin preparing for the upcoming spawn. Trout stocking for the
winter months is coming to a close and there are only a couple of
stockings left at the lower elevation lakes for this year. 2010 –
2011 Winter Stocking Schedule

URBAN WATERS — Healthy catfish arrived March 24. They ranged in
size from 1.5 to 4 pounds. Word is they started biting right away
on worms, hot dogs, shrimp and stink baits. Daily limits are four
catfish per person at Urban Lakes and 2 per person at Urban Ponds.
Anglers are encouraged to call Operation Game Thief, any time at
1-800-352-0700 to report any ongoing over-limit or license
violations.

March 30, there were 22,000 bluegill stocked in Phoenix and Tucson
Program Waters. They readily bite on meal worms, worms or
doughballs fished under small bobbers along the shorelines. Daily
bag limits for bluegill/sunfish are 10 per day at Urban Lakes or 5
per day at Urban Ponds.

Best baits for the big cats are worms, stink baits, hot dogs or
shrimp fished on the bottom. Many catfish anglers have caught
limits of catfish from the larger urban waters using stink baits
and dough baits.

Please send me your fishing reports from Southern Arizona! Fishing
reports can be sent to Don Mitchell, Regional Fish Program Manager
by email at dmitchell@azgfd.gov. These reports will then be
complied and reported in our weekly fishing reports.

Summers coming and that means the bass and bluegill fishing is
warming up also! Anglers should begin to focus their attention
along the shoreline in shady areas for great sunfish opportunities.
Live worms and meal worms are the classic baits for these little
fighters. Bass anglers will find the best action along the
shoreline as well wherever you find breaks in the shoreline
vegetation. Trout stocking for the summer months is underway. You
can view the schedule here: 2011 Summer Stocking Schedule

RIGGS FLAT – Riggs Flat is now open. No recent reports of success.
Trout stocking for the summer months is underway. You can view the
schedule here: 2011 Summer Stocking Schedule

CLUFF RANCH – No recent reports of success. The pond is full and
there are no issues with boat launching. For lake information call
(928) 485-9430.

ROPER LAKE – For lake information and status of the park call (928)
428-6760.

DANKWORTH POND – This small pond is undergoing renovations this
summer and will be closed to fishing. The plan is to remove the
cattails to open up more fishable water, add artificial habitat
structures and rebuild a fish population.

FRYE MESA RESERVIOR -The lake has been stocked with Gila trout.
Currently the plan is to stock it once again with Gila Trout in
May. The limit is 1 Gila trout in bag or possession. All other
trout species limits remain unchanged. Anglers are strongly
encouraged to know the differences in the 4 species of trout they
will encounter at the lake before keeping fish to avoid legal
problems.

KEARNY LAKES – This small lake remains fishless due to impacts of
golden algae.

ARIVACA – No recent reports of success but reports are that the
bass have spawned. Remember that all bass must be immediately
released back to the water. Anglers are asked to please be aware of
your wake so as not to disrupt other anglers fishing from other
boats and the shore.

PENA BLANCA – Anglers were still catching trout late last week. The
new boat ramp is open at Pena Blanca Lake and anglers should have
no problems launching their boats.

PATAGONIA – This lake is full. No recent reports of success.

PARKER CANYON – No recent reports of success. The store at the lake
is open and information on the store and current conditions can be
found at www.parkercanyonlake.com.

Hello,

Anglers have been having a great spring as all species are going
gangbusters. A report of 24 bass being caught on one boat this
weekend all catch and release. The panfish are also biting very
wells.

The lake is still open for recreation during the repaving of the
campgrounds!

Thanks, Scott

Parker Lake Store

ROSE CANYON LAKE -Road Access is open. The lake has been stocked
and anglers are reporting success. You can view the schedule here:
2011 Summer Stocking Schedule

 

Categories: News Archive

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *