Man pleads guilty to unlawful killing of migratory bird — again

Reading, Pa.
— 
Pennsylvania Game Commission officials today recently that Roy
Gordon Lovell, 74, of Glen Rock pled guilty to one count of the
unlawful killing of a Canada goose and one count of false or
fraudulent statements to an officer on April 28.  The charges
stemmed from an incident on April 20, in Codorus Township, York
County. 

“Although there is a
lawful hunting season for the taking of Canada geese, the violation
occurred during the closed season for hunting or taking this
species,” said Chad Eyler, Game Commission Wildlife Conservation
Officer for southwestern York County. “Canada geese are protected
by both state and federal law, and established hunting seasons must
be followed.

Magisterial District
Judge Kim Leppo sentenced Lovell to pay a $300 fine for the false
and fraudulent statements to an officer charge and a $200 fine for
killing of the Canada goose.  Additionally, Lovell was ordered to
pay $200 for the replacement cost of the goose.  The imposition of
the replacement costs was the first time replacement costs for
killing a Canada goose were imposed in York County under a new
restitution section approved by the Board of Game Commissioners in
April 2009.  The new replacement costs were adopted by the Board to
enhance penalties associated with poaching and deter poaching
activity.

 

On April 20, a witness reported to
the Game Commission that Lovell had shot at and killed a Canada
goose on his property near Glen Rock.  Deputy Wildlife Conservation
Officer Robert Simmonds conducted an investigation and found
evidence that proved Lovell had unlawfully killed the bird. 

WCO Chad Eyler and
Simmonds filed charges on Lovell for the April 20
incident.

Eyler noted this is
the second time since December Lovell has been convicted of
unlawfully killing migratory birds in York County.

On Dec. 7, Lovell pled
guilty to one count of unlawful taking and possession of a great
blue heron in front of Judge Leppo.  The charges stemmed from an
incident on Sept. 3, also in Codorus Township, York County.  Great
blue herons also are protected by both state and federal law.  In
this case, Lovell was ordered to pay a $200 fine and $200 for the
replacement costs of the bird.

“Although this is the
second time in less than five months that we have cited Mr. Lovell,
we are pleased to bring this case to a successful conclusion and
believe the combined penalty will act as a deterrent to this
individual and others who would engage in such unlawful acts,”
Eyler said. “This incident also demonstrates the importance and
value of having Deputy Wildlife Conservation Officers, and that we
are blessed to have them serve the citizens and wildlife of
Pennsylvania.”

Categories: Pennsylvania – Jeff Mulhollem

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