U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Rescued bald eagle oldest ever documented in Maine

Wildlife officials found a band on the bird’s leg and ran it through a database to learn that it had been banded shortly after hatching on June 21, 1983, making it nearly 34 years old — far beyond the average bald eagle lifespan of about 20 years in the wild.

GPS-collar failures hinder wolf-tracking in Oregon

The minimum known wolf population in 2016 was 112, a 2 percent increase from 2015, the report said. That’s much smaller than the previous three years in which the population increased by 27, or 36 percent. The weak increase could be caused by wolves being present but not counted, decreased births, human-caused deaths, diseases affecting pups, and wolves leaving the state, the report said.

Montana’s Diane Boyd: The Jane Goodall of wolves

Now, nearly four decades after she first arrived in Montana from Minnesota and following years of non-wolf work, Diane Boyd has orbited back to her professional origins with her new role as wolf management and carnivore specialist for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Region 1.

Idaho governor appeals dismissal of sage grouse lawsuit

The legal action was among a number of lawsuits filed in September 2015 after federal officials opted not to list sage grouse under the Endangered Species Act but announced federal land-use restrictions. Environmental groups later filed lawsuits contending the restrictions designed to protect sage grouse habitat didn’t go far enough.