Great Lakes

Fish passage project could have ‘broad impact’ on Great Lakes

Walleye along with yellow perch, suckers and smallmouth bass could again swim the winding Boardman River beyond downtown Traverse City to forage for food or spawn in submerged vegetation, as they did more than a century ago.Walleye, yellow perch, suckers and smallmouth bass could again swim the winding Boardman River beyond downtown Traverse City to forage for food or spawn…

Getting to the guts of Lake Huron fishery trends

Stomach contents from a lake trout. (Katie Kierczynski, Michigan State University Department of Fisheries and Wildlife)Changes in what these fish are eating have important management implications for Lake Huron and the Great Lakes. For the story, click here. Categories: News Tags: Fishing, Great Lakes, Lake Huron

Balloons – yes, balloons – wreak havoc with Great Lakes wildlife

(U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)DETROIT — Environmental advocates are raising awareness about the dangers of balloons for wildlife in the Great Lakes and elsewhere. Volunteers for the Alliance for the Great Lakes picked up more than 18,000 balloons, balloon pieces or balloon strings along Great Lakes shorelines from 2016 to 2018, the Detroit Free Press reported. Lara O’Brien, who studies…

What’s sinister about baby’s breath?

Volunteers at Elberta Beach work to eradicate baby’s breath. (Grand Traverse Conservancy District photo)Invasive species often have ugly, dangerous, often xenophobic-sounding names. Even if a person had never heard of a sea lamprey, its name sounds like a customer you wouldn’t want to meet. The red swamp crayfish could be an escapee from a Hollywood movie set, and Asian carp…

Great Lakes see ‘Superior’ ice coverage

Lake Superior was 94 percent ice covered as of Friday, marking first time the largest of the Great Lakes had more than 90 percent coverage in four years. But warmer temperatures in the coming days will start to bring on a great melt.

Two new exotic species identified in Lake Erie

Experts say the discovery in the planet’s largest freshwater system is alarming. Researchers are uncertain what risks the tiny creatures may pose. The university plans to monitor the situation but says both species haven’t been deemed invasive because of their low abundance.