Maple syrup

Of mud and maple sap: rites of spring

For the year-round outdoorsman, there are two times of the year that can be the toughest to get through: the holiday season, and the first few weeks of spring. At year’s end, once deer season is over, it’s often hurry up and wait for the snow to fall and/or the ice to thicken so we can move on to the…

Try stove-top syrups this spring

Seeing displays of sap-tapping tools and equipment might turn most outdoors enthusiasts and gardeners to a different store location. But fear not, anyone who can identify a maple tree, any maple, even a box elder, can make enough maple syrup for at least one pancake or French toast feed with a few neighbors. While most sugar-bush tappers wait until a…

East vs. West maple syrup madness on tap in Indiana

LAGRANGE, Ind. — By the time your pancake mops up the pure maple syrup on your plate, the sweet nectar has stewed over a fire – and stewed and stewed, as billows of steam remove water from the sap. Sometimes the workers have to boil it longer because the sugar content of the maple-tree sap is lower. It forces them…

Maple syrup-making provides outdoor family fun in Michigan

There’s an old saying that goes, “From tiny acorns grow mighty oaks.” In this case, it was maple trees and the seed that was planted was that of inspiration. Last March, Christian LeSage, a Michigan Department of Natural Resources fisheries biologist, and his family went to Fenner Nature Center in Lansing for its annual Maple Syrup Festival. That glimpse into how sap is…