A good time at Lake Superior – First Place, Junior Prose

“Pshhhh, pshhhh.”

The water washed along the sand and wiped away the footprints
we’d left behind. The sun sparkled and danced on the gently pulsing
water, making it look like the lake was shining, as my friend
Claire and I walked down the sand shores of Lake Superior one
bright summer day.

Does it sound fun to you?

If so, come along with us so you can enjoy the natural beauty of
Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Leave behind your socks, shoes and
jacket – you won’t need them. Roll up your pants, because here we
go.

We’re walking down the sandy shoreline. “Whooooit, whooooit,
whooooit” the sand is singing as we drag our feet.

Now we are at a thin, shallow, medium-paced river. Look at the
shiny pebbles that dot its bottom.

The river starts in that small pond with slimy green algae on
its rocks. Water from that other, faster river empties into the
pond, from which this river flows. See! This river empties into the
lake. Jump over it! “Weeeeee!”

As we walk, watch out for beach-grass. It’s poky…ouch! 

There’s the reef; almost totally submerged in the water. See the
sandpipers hopping around? They’re funny, hey? The seagulls just
sit on the end and squawk – “Awwwwk, awwwwk.”

See this rocky outcrop? We’ve dubbed it alligator rock because
it kind of looks like an alligator partly in the water.

These crumbly rocks with ledges on top of one another are what
we call potato chip rocks. Hear the crunch and crackle as we walk
over them?

Come wade in the cool water with me and look for pretty rocks,
or if you’d rather not get your feet wet, we can play Don’t Touch
the Water. It’s a simple game. All you have to do is run right next
to the water and when a wave comes, run up the beach so you don’t
get wet.

These massive black boulders in a pile are what we call the
first black rocks, because they are the first pile of them – first,
but not only. There are about six piles of them.

Crackle, crackle… more potato chip rocks.

Wow, look at these awesome designs in the sandstone. The colors
are swirled together and splotched inside each other. These big
chunks will be good for skipping.

You don’t know how?

Watch what I do. Hold the rock so it’s flat, and then throw it
so it spins but stays flat. You’ve got it. Good job!

Whoa, the wind’s speeding up. Hurry to the second black rocks,
but be careful. The waves splashing on them make them slippery.

Sit on this rock, and something will happen. Look at that huge
wave. Ha ha! I tricked you. The wave splashed you, now you’re all
wet! Let Claire and I have a turn. “Eeeeeek! The water’s cold.”

Let’s keep going. Hopping from rock to rock like this makes me
feel like a mountain goat. How about you?

Oh, now you have to be careful, because right here the rock edge
broke off, so you can either walk through the woods, or you can
brace your feet on the rock part in the water, and move your hands
along this narrow edge. A third option is to walk on the narrow
ledge itself. I‘ll take the third way, so will Claire. How about
you? This rock ledge is really unstable, so be careful.

Now you need to wade through the water. “Burrrr, it’s pretty
cold.”

I guess you could walk through the woods, but that’s
scratchy.

Ouch! Walking on this rock sandbar hurts my feet because it’s so
hot. Does it hurt yours?

I really enjoy walking down here. It is so peaceful and quiet
and pretty.

It’s getting late and I’m starved and hot so let’s run back to
camp so we can eat and swim, okay? Good.

It’s been a fun walk, don’t you think?

Categories: Youth Writing Contest

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