U.S. Geological Survey

Scientists continue battle to save bats from mysterious disease

The Pennsylvania species being targeted by this fieldwork include northern long-eared bats. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services photo)  QUANTICO, Va. — When the sun sets and nearby Marines wind down for the evening, Sam Freeze suits up and goes bat hunting. Six nights a week in the summer, the doctoral student at Virginia Tech tromps through the woods at Marine…

Researchers: Shorter winters may increase presence of harmful algae blooms – and impact fishing

MOUND, Minn. — University of Minnesota-Duluth researchers are studying how shorter winters may increase the presence of harmful algae blooms and impact fishing. The researchers worked with the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Maryland to gather data from six lakes across the state, Minnesota Public Radio reported. “With climate change, our winters are getting shorter and shorter and…

Study: Salt levels in U.S. rivers becoming dangerous

American Rivers annually publishes a list of the 10 most at-risk rivers in the U.S.Many of the nation’s rivers and streams have levels of salt that are becoming dangerous, posing a threat to drinking water sources, infrastructure, and marine ecosystems and organisms of all kinds, according to a study published Monday, Jan. 8 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences….

Congress debates oil drilling in largest U.S. wildlife refuge

The plain provides food and a vantage point from which caribou can spot predators from far away. But beneath the lichens and cotton grass, there’s a hidden resource: crude oil.ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Sometime next April, pregnant cows in the Porcupine Caribou Herd in Canada will take the lead in an annual migration of nearly 200,000 animals north to Alaska. From…