Bees

Listen to nature’s sounds and decipher the meanings

These prairie flowers, shooting stars, release pollen from a bumblebee buzzing. (Photo by Jerry Davis)Most animal sounds, usually called vocalizations and regardless of origin, carry meanings. Sometimes they are calls to others of their kind, attracting mates, sounding alarms, finding food, and in some cases acquiring food. Insects are common pollinators, which are attracted to a plant offering something including…

Study: Minnesota among leading states in bee, butterfly protection

(Minnesota DNR)ST. PAUL, Minn. — Minnesota ranks among the top states in the country for its work to protect declining bee and butterfly populations, according to a new study. Damon Hall, an assistant professor at Missouri State University, examined every pollinator-related law that was passed by a state legislature between 2000 and 2017, Minnesota Public Radio News reported. Hall said…

Beekeepers in South Dakota aim to rescue, relocate honeybees

(Minnesota DNR)SPEARFISH, S.D. — Honeybees are a lot like South Dakotans. They’re hard-working and industrious, they have an agricultural based economy, they all strive to work for the greater good, and they’re pretty easygoing until their home or loved ones are threatened. So it makes sense that South Dakota is the second largest honey producer in the country, based on…

Informational seminar to focus on Ohio’s pollinators

A bee gathering nectar from a spring twinleaf (Jeffersonia diphylla) flower. The fragile flowers bloom around Thomas Jefferson’s birthday, April 13, and last for only a few days. (Photo by Frank Hinchey)Pollinating insects are making up for lost time in Ohio as a late spring wakes up nectar-filled wildflowers along byways, in fields and prairies, and residential backyards. To better help Ohioans…

Detroit joins in backyard beekeeping trend

A rusty patched bumblebee. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)DETROIT — For the past few years, national media have touted Detroit’s comeback story: It endured dark days, went through the nation’s largest municipal bankruptcy, and is – literally, with the construction of a new skyscraper – on the rise. The city is about to face a different kind of buzz….

Wisconsin beekeepers seeing big losses this winter

MADISON, Wis. — Some Wisconsin beekeepers are reporting high losses of bees this winter because of a parasite that infests hives and kills developing bees. Kent Pegorsch, president of the Wisconsin Honey Producers Association, told Wisconsin Public Radio that beekeepers had difficulty controlling varroa mites last year. Beekeepers have been losing about half of their hives over the winter for…

More efforts to help Indiana’s struggling bees

LAFAYETTE, Ind. — For years, decades actually, alarm bells have been sounding in scientific communities regarding the United States’ falling bee population. Scientists blame everything from disease-spreading mites to overuse of pesticides to depletion of natural habitats for the decline of bee populations. Many scientists and beekeeping enthusiasts, like Tim Caldwell, owner of Indy Bee Supply out of Indianapolis, think…

Michigan family turns beekeeping hobby into a business

A rusty patched bumblebee. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)UNIONVILLE, Mich. — About 10 years ago, Josh and Jodie Kieliszewski noticed a wild swarm of bees had made a home in one of the trees on their property in rural Unionville in Michigan. Josh Kieliszewski, an agriculture science teacher at Unionville-Sebewaing Area High School at the time, and Jodie Kieliszewski,…

DNR on the lookout for rare bumble bee

(Minnesota DNR)Most people try to avoid bumble bees. Erica Hoaglund goes looking for them. A biologist with the Minnesota DNR’s Nongame Wildlife Program, Hoaglund is on the lookout for the increasingly rare rusty-patched bumble bee. Earlier this year, it became the first bumble bee to be placed on the federal list of endangered species. In response, states within the bee’s…

Indiana beekeepers turn to biology to save colonies

A rusty patched bumblebee. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Standing feet from around 250,000 bees, Ellie Symes spoke about the nearly 4.25 million more The Bee Corp. is in the process of acquiring. The fact that she is allergic earned a casual mention. “I used to bee-keep in dresses,” Symes said, adding that she hadn’t always been allergic…