Bats

Scientists continue battle to save bats from mysterious disease

The Pennsylvania species being targeted by this fieldwork include northern long-eared bats. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services photo)  QUANTICO, Va. — When the sun sets and nearby Marines wind down for the evening, Sam Freeze suits up and goes bat hunting. Six nights a week in the summer, the doctoral student at Virginia Tech tromps through the woods at Marine…

Officials seeing more Michigan bats infected with rabies

LANSING, Mich. — Michigan officials say they’re seeing higher numbers of bats with rabies. The Department of Health and Human Services says its labs had diagnosed 22 bats with the fatal illness as of June 28. A year ago, the total was nine. Two rabid skunks also have turned up. Rabies is a viral disease transmitted through the bite or…

For first time, fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats detected in Wyoming

Because of disease, the little brown bat is one of the rarest bats in Pennsylvania. About 99 percent of their population has been wiped out in the state. In January, the little brown was classified as endangered by the Pennsylvania Game Commission.CHEYENNE — Wyoming wildlife researchers working at Fort Laramie National Historic Site in Goshen County have detected the fungus that…

Vandals deliver a blow to Michigan bat research project

DNR wildlife biologists have been working with researchers from Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana and Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo to field test a treatment for bats and mines in the western Upper Peninsula, in hopes of developing an effective compound to combat white-nose syndrome.

In Alaska, citizen scientists can help keep bat disease at bay

JUNEAU, Alaska — America’s bats are in a bad way. Since 2006, a deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome (WNS) has ravaged bat populations across America, killing an estimated 6 million with as much as 99 percent fatality. WNS still hasn’t found its way to Alaska, but if and when it does, scientists at the Alaska Department of Fish…

Are bats bouncing back in Pennsylvania’s cavern system?

HUNTINGDON, Pa. — Officials at a Pennsylvania cave formation say bats have been observed hibernating there for the first time since a fungus nearly wiped out the state’s bat population. Lincoln Caverns coordinator Jennifer Brumbaugh says officials spotted four or five bats hibernating in the Huntingdon caverns this winter. Brumbaugh says the number is significant considering zero bats were observed…

Researcher: Fungus could wipe out big Alabama bat colony

Southeastern bat with white-nose syndrome. (Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources/Dottie Brown)BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — A Georgia researcher who has studied one of Alabama’s biggest bat colonies says it could be all but wiped out within years by the deadly fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. Chris Cornelison, a doctoral student at Kennesaw State University, and two other researchers surveyed the…

Louisiana could be key to bat survival of white-nose fungus

BATON ROUGE, La. — With Halloween here, it’s the bats that should be scared. A relatively new disease has ravaged populations across the eastern half of North America, but Louisiana could hold the key to keeping the species alive. Bats – of the order Chiroptera, meaning “winged hands” – may conjure images of blood-sucking vampires, but the local varieties are…

Wisconsin researcher hopes to use UV light to save bats

MADISON, Wis. — A researcher from a federal laboratory in Madison is experimenting with using ultraviolet light to control a fungal disease that has killed millions of cave-dwelling bats in the United States. Daniel Lindner, a research plant pathologist with the U.S. Forest Service, has received almost $156,000 from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to fund his white-nose syndrome research, the…

Public-private partnership means nearly $1.4 million to fight bat disease

HOUSTON — A public-private partnership is granting nearly $1.4 million to test treatments to halt a disease threatening the nation’s bat population. The white-nose syndrome fungus, first detected in New York state in 2006, has spread to 31 states and five Canadian provinces. Texas and Nebraska are the most recent states infected. The grants announced Tuesday in Houston include more…

White-nose syndrome taking toll on Wisconsin bat population

MANITOWOC, Wis. — The number of bats in Wisconsin is dropping, and environmentalists blame the sudden loss on white-nose syndrome, a fatal disease that is passed bat to bat. The deadly disease traveled east to Wisconsin around 2014, and some counties have lost an estimated 90 percent of their bat population, The Herald Times Reporter reported. Manitowoc County also has…

Idaho racing to combat deadly bat fungus

TWIN FALLS, Idaho — Officials are scrambling to slow a deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of bats before it eventually spreads to Idaho. The Times-News reports the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is partnering with National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Idaho Power Co. and Idaho National Laboratory to monitor for the fungus….