Last minute scope mounting tip for deer hunters

This past winter I moved scopes around on a number of rifles so I could get my best scope (a Kahles) placed onto the rifle that I use most often when hunting out west (a Savage Model 116 in .30/06). The scope that had been on the Savage had taken a pretty good beating over the years and I could no longer get the elevation to change when sighting it in.

So, that old Simmons came off and I moved the Kahles to the Savage from a Weatherby Vanguard in .270 Win. I also moved a Bushnell 3200 Elite from a Winchester Model 70 in .270 WSM to a new Model 70 gun chambered in .30/06, and then put a straight 4X scope on my first rifle, a Model 110 Savage in .30/30 so my youngest daughter could use that rifle during the 2013 deer season loaded with Hornady Leverevolution loads.

What I forgot to do was put a scope back on the Weatherby. I figured that out the other day when a friend told me that she was down to one rifle for her and her son to use during this year's gun deer season. No worries, I said, and went to grab the Weatherby for her to use. Oops. No scope. With all of that scope jockeying, I had forgotten that the Vanguard was still sitting there naked. After doing some snooping around in my equipment storage areas, I discovered that I still had a new Bushnell Elite DOA 600 in the box. Then I remembered that I was supposed to have mounted that scope on the Weatherby last fall. So, this morning I grabbed the hex wrenches and went to work.

Once the scope was mounted, I sat there trying to remember how to best bore sight a rifle if you don't have one of those nifty laser bore sighting tools. I remember something about looking down the barrel at a round object – say a door knob – and then adjusting the scope's windage and elevation knobs to bring the crosshairs to that same point. Then it hit me – Google it. Sure enough, I found some great advice online from the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF). If you are mounting a scope and need a easy way to get "on paper" quickly, check the web site below. This information from NSSF will save you a lot of time and ammo. For future reference, remember the NSSF. This organization has a lot of helpful firearms information for hunters and shooters.

Video: A bore-sighting tip from the National Shooting Sports Foundation

Categories: Bloggers on Hunting, Firearms, Wisconsin – Dean Bortz

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