A thought about wolves and dogs

Jerry DavisRare is the person who is so set in his or her ways, those who raise their voice every time a certain topic comes up, but then surprises us by being won over by our way of thinking.

In other words, why would someone be swayed by someone else’s ideas?  That’s asking them to give in to two things, not just one.  Maybe even three.  We’re just not likely to do that these days.  The politicians have taught us all too well.

Here are the two points of submission.  First, we will have to admit we were wrong.  Second, we have to admit to our opponent he was correct.  That’s difficult to do because so many outdoors pursuits have become contests, literally tests of our prowess.

To change, we are submitting to much more than just thinking differently.

Through all of these arguments, we’ve grown to hate the other guy, the other side of the concern, and we may have long forgotten why.  It may simply be the way he argues or the sneer he has when he speaks.

Out here in the rural areas we have a phrase for that sneer.  We call it a manure spreader’s grin, so some such language.

It’s much more likely we’ll come around to taking a new stance if a third party, someone with nothing to gain or lose, presents us with some facts.  Then, we might quietly listen, walk away, and jump the fence to the other side.  Here, too, but only if no one else is listening or watching our moves.

The point of all of this is to suggest there might be a way for those on either side of the dogs and wolves issue to save face, so to speak.  That’s what it’s usually about anyway, isn’t it?  Not admitting we were wrong, not admitting to the other side that they won.

So, if you can afford a few bucks, or beg, borrow or steal from your son’s or daughter’s book shelf, a copy of Wilson Rawls’ 1961 book, Where the Red Fern Grows.  It’s easily available.  It’s still widely sold.  It’s cheap.  And it’s small enough you can hide it from everyone.  No one will know you have it.

Next is a harder part.  Read it.

I’m not suggesting you’ll change your mind one way or the other. I say that not knowing which side you’re on.   And I don’t care, either.

Then in the quiet of the night rethink your reasoning, by yourself.  No one is yelling at you, no one will know.  The decision to change, or stay with your original ideas are all up to you.

Try it, you may surprise yourself.

I’m pretty sure you’ll be more comfortable with yourself, whichever side you end up supporting.

Categories: Bloggers on Hunting, Wisconsin – Jerry Davis

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