How To’s

The basic skill we don’t respect: boat control

Boat control is a major factor when fishing for any species of fish. It’s an important element for success on any body of water. If you can’t maneuver your machine in order to put the bait or lures exactly where the fish are at, you’re wasting your time. We often think fish will travel that distance, but they will not….

Reintroduce yourself to slip bobbers

I’m seeing renewed interest in slip-bobber fishing for walleyes, a technique that can be extremely productive along inside weedlines, rocks, and reefs – especially in wind-blown areas. A prime way to fish, for example – if you have wind coming into a rock pile, reef, or weed edge – is to drop a jig or hook with some live bait…

Fishing plastics: the method

While fishing, I observe lots of angler behavior, and I can definitely say many people tend to fish plastics too fast – especially for bass – whether it’s a tube rigged wacky or Texas-rigged. We need to slow down and try new techniques for retrieving a lure. Most anglers simply work the lift-drop, lift-drop. There’s nothing wrong with casting out and…

It’s always time for crankbaits

Crankbaits are one of my favorite multi-species lures, but they don’t perform unless you employ them properly. Set your crankbait at the correct depth, or in a tough bite or with less-aggressive fish, fish won’t chase it. Use your electronics to mark the location of fish, then put the crankbait in their zone. We need to match crankbaits with conditions….

Plant fields now for fall mourning dove hunts

Dove hunters still have time to plant fields to attract doves during the upcoming season, according to a wildlife biologist with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources. The mourning dove is the most popular game species in the Southeast, and South Carolina is blessed with an abundance of these speedy birds. The best way to attract large numbers of doves…

Duck ID on the Wing

Species identification is one of duck hunting’s biggest challenges. With species driven harvest management, hunters run the risk of going over the limit if they can’t identify species, and in the case of mallards, knowing gender, before pulling the trigger.