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Fishing Report for Southeastern Utah, March 09, 2012

Fishing report for the Southeastern Region put together by the DWR.

Posted on March 14, 2012

ABAJO MOUNTAINS: (March 09) Conservation Officer Dennis Shumway reports that fishing is generally slow in San Juan County. Some anglers were fishing Blanding #4 with lures. Recapture Reservoir is about 2/3 open water. Blanding #3, Foy, Monticello and Lloyds Lake are all still covered in ice. Anglers have not been fishing at ice-covered lakes and reservoirs.

ACADEMY MILL RESERVOIR: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

BLUE LAKE: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

CARBON COUNTY COMMUNITY FISHING POND: (March 05) The ice has melted and the gate opened on March 3, 2012.

CLEVELAND RESERVOIR: (March 09) Lieutenant Carl Gramlich fished two weeks ago and reported good fishing for 17- to 18-inch rainbow trout using white or green plastic jigs tipped with mealworms. Carl fished in 10 to 12 feet of water and said that morning was the best time to fish. Angling success declines as the day progresses.

DUCK FORK RESERVOIR: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

FERRON RESERVOIR: (March 09) All fish were removed last fall. Restocking will not recur until June.

GIGLIOTTI POND: (March 09) Lieutenant Carl Gramlich reports open water on the north end. The remaining ice pack is slushy, and ice fishing is expected to be dangerous. Please exercise extreme caution.

GOOSEBERRY RESERVOIR: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

GRASSY LAKE: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

HUNTINGTON NORTH RESERVOIR: (March 09) State Park Manager Dan Richards reports that the reservoir is still covered in ice, but the ice is probably dangerous. Please use extreme caution when ice fishing, and observe all ice safety precautions.

HUNTINGTON RESERVOIR: (March 05) The ice is extremely thick.

JOES VALLEY RESERVOIR: (March 09) Fisheries Biologist Dan Keller fished the reservoir on February 18 and found slow fishing. Dan caught a few splake, the largest being 16 inches, and a tiger trout. He recommends using a green paddle bug tipped with chub meat. He said that fishing in the afternoon was better than in the morning. Please exercise extreme caution, especially near the west side marina. There are warm springs near the west side marina that have thinned the ice, creating hazards that are impossible to see.

LA SAL MOUNTAINS: (March 09) Conservation Officer TJ Robertson reports that Kens Lake remained open all winter long. You can only access the La Sal Mountain lakes by snow machine.

MILLER FLAT RESERVOIR: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

MILLSITE RESERVOIR & STATE PARK: (March 09) Conservation Officer Ben Stearns reports that the reservoir consists mostly of open water. Anglers are casting bait from the shore. Try using jigs and meal worms. Tom Ogden fly fished on March 6 and caught most of his fish close to shore in 12 to 18 feet of water. He recommends a size 6 bead head olive leech with a gold rib. The trout Tom caught ranged from 13 to 16 inches. Besides one splake, half were cutthroats and half were rainbows.

PETES HOLE: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

POTTERS PONDS: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

SCOFIELD RESERVOIR: (March 09) Sergeant Stacey Jones reports brutal fishing conditions with layers of snow, slush and water. Last weekend, Jones found that most of the catch consisted of rainbow trout up to 17 inches. Anglers had the most fishing success for all species on the east side of the reservoir. For tiger and cutthroat trout, try using Kastmasters tipped with chub meat, worms, wax worms, PowerBait and meal worms. Chub meat has outpaced all other baits.

On February 16, the catch-and-release tiger trout record was broken at Scofield Reservoir (as recorded by Division Biologist Don Wiley). The record fish measured 27 inches. On February 17, Trent Peery of Santaquin broke the state angling record for tiger trout. He caught a 15.16-pound, 32.25-inch tiger trout with a girth of 20 inches through the ice.

Despite the record-breaking fish, some anglers have avoided Scofield because of the icy water, slush and thick ice. Conservation Officer Devin Christensen urges you to wear warm clothing and make sure your boots are waterproof.

The Division hopes to reduce the chub population and save both habitat and food for sport fish. Please read the Utah Fishing Guidebook for information about Scofield's special regulations, including the slot limit. (Most citations at Scofield are being written for slot limit violations.) If you need help correctly distinguishing cutthroat and tiger trout from rainbow trout, see page 30 in the guidebook. You can also find illustrations of cutthroat trout on pages 45–46 and tiger trout on page 56.

SOUP BOWL: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

WILLOW LAKE: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.

WRIGLEY SPRINGS RESERVOIR: (March 05) Access to this high elevation water is prohibited by snow.