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Long Island/NYC Fishing Report - August 22nd, 2013

Posted on August 22, 2013

The snapper fishing was excellent in all areas. Spearing fished under a bobber, snapper poppers and small tins all caught snappers around 6 inches long. Snappers were also caught by anglers targeting porgies and fluke with regularity. A few “snapper blues” between one and two pounds occasionally spiced up the action, especially in the inlets and along the North Shore beaches. 

Larger bluefish were caught under the bunker pods off the South Shore and throughout New York Harbor, where bunker chunks fished on a fish-finder rig was the method of choice.

The blue claw crab fishing was excellent in the South Shore bays.  During the day crab traps from the shore and killie rings for boat anglers were the top producers. At night, crabbing with a spotlight was excellent. The majority of crabs are keepers.

The inshore fluke fishing has improved in quantity, but the number of keepers has dropped for inshore anglers. The best tide was the incoming tide, with the top of the tide best.  The best bet for keepers has been off the north side of Montauk Point and around Orient Point, with pool fish in the 5- to 8-pound class. Large strip baits as well as live baits were the baits of choice for the largest fluke.  The offshore fluke bite is improving but is still slower than the inshore fishing. The best ocean fishing was near the inlet mouths and out to about 30 feet of water. On the North Shore, the fluke fishing around Port Jefferson was good for anglers using bucktails tipped with squid strips.

The sea bass fishing on artificial reefs off the South Shore was good, with a fair number of large fish to 5 pounds caught on clams, squid and live killies. Small sea bass are being caught off the North Shore beaches and around the pilings of the inlet bridges and along the inlet rocks. Triggerfish were caught in the inlet rocks and around the buoy chains. 

The striper fishing was very good in both The Gut and The Race, with live eels the bait of choice. The fishing was generally slow elsewhere, with fair fishing on clams in the South Shore inlet bridges on the night tides.

The ocean beaches continued to see a few schoolie-sized bass falling for bucktails and diamond jigs during the early mornings and evenings.  Flyrodders also scored on sand eel patterns.

The porgy fishing in the Peconics, off Jessup’s Neck and around Shelter Island continued to be good on clams or small-squid strips, with plenty of clam chum improving the fishing significantly.

The shark bite has slowed, but there are enough sharks to make the run offshore worthwhile. The usual 20 to 30 fathom wrecks and fingers are all producing a mix of brown sharks, a few hammerheads and some makos.

The bluefin tuna bite at the Coimbra is still good, with the best fishing occurring before the first light on the troll. A fair number of bigeye tuna were caught at the canyons on the troll. The night bite has yet to turn on. 

Guy Zummo

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